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ATHENA 2007 



2006-2007 Athena Yearbook 

Volume 102 

Ohio University 

Athens, Ohio 

Enrollment: 16,761 



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Photo by: James Robles 



LlilTTlilR FROM TlUl IHmTOKS: 

From two girls who now feel more at home in this Southeast 
Ohio college town than in the place we were both raised, this is our 
contribution to your OU experience. Even though it's only a year 
from now, neither one of us can even begin to imagine the day we'll 
have to walk away from Athens. The six-week winter break that we 
used to brag to our friends about, now feels a few weeks too long. 
And even the beauty of the beach on which we've spent so many 
summers, can no longer make July and August pass quick enough. 
Don't get us wrong, Ashtabula will always be home, but we've done 
more growing up during three years in this town than we probably 
ever could have anywhere else. 

So, this book is largely dedicated to those of you who are brave 
enough to be doing what is so unimaginable to us: saying good-bye 
to Ohio University. The majority of you were here before us and, in 
your own way, made this place what it is now. For that we thank you. 
And when you return, we hope you find your school and your town in 
familiar form. 

To those of you who still have time left on this campus, our 
advice to you is simple: Milk it, for everything that it's worth. No 
matter what level of super senior status you obtain, you'll never feel 
as though you've had quite enough time here. But do what you can 
to fill your days with the things that you won't find anywhere else. 
Once you get beyond the classes, tests and papers, you'll find there is 
so much to learn in these years. 

We are so grateful for the opportunity we have been given 
through this book, to make our own mark on Ohio University. I hope 
you all feel as though we have found and showcased the things on 
this campus that have you hoping against hope that it'll never end. It 
is our earnest belief that unless you've walked these brick streets so 
often that the pavement of sidewalks feels foreign to your shoes, you 
just don't get it. 



Here is to getting it. Cheers! 

^ (fa/^a^ Jane- &: Am^ Ros& 



OHIO IJMVlilKSn Y ADMIMSTRATIVi: STAFF: 



Dr. Roderick J. McDavis President 



Alan H. Geiger 
William Y. Smith 
Gwendolyn C. Taylor 
Jennifer Kirksey 
Joe Brennan 
Kathv A. Ki-endl 



Assistant to the President '■ 

Executive Assistant to the President for Institutional Equity 

Assistant to the President for Diversity 

Assistant to the President; Coordinator of Special Projects 

Executive Director of University Communications and Marketing 

Provost 



William R. Decatur 



Vice President for Finance and Administration 



Charles P. Bird 
John A. Bantle II 



Vice President for University Outreach and Regional Campuses 
Vice President for Research 



Kent J. Smith, Jr. 



Vice President for Student Affairs 



Howard Lipman 
Terrence Hogan 



Vice President for University Advancement 
Dean of Students 



OHIO IJXIVFKSn Y BOARD OF TUIJSTFFS: 



R. Gregor\' Browning 



Chair 



C. Daniel DeLawder 



Vice Chair 



J. Michael Lawrie 



National Trustee 



Charles R. Stuckey, Jr. 



National Trustee 



Alan H. Geiaer 



Secretarv 



William R. Decatur 



Treasurer 



Micah Mitchell 



Student Trustee 



Lvdia Gerthoffer 



Student Trustee 



Scott P. Borsemenke 



Norman E. Dewire 
Gene T. Harris 



^»* 



C. Robert Kidder 



M. Marnette Pern 



Schev 



C. David Snyder 



ATHENA STAFF: 

Co Editors-in-Chief: Amy Giannell 

Sarah Hatmaker 

Public Relations: Brittany Elsden 

Writers: Krista Bradley 
Danielle Bukvic 
Lydia Gutierrez 
Emilie Schneider 
Brianna Voight 

Designers: Ashlee Dolan 
Mandi Mellott 

Photographers: James Robles 

Lacey Rogers 
Charles Yesenczki 



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From big names to no names, campus events add to Athens. 

Story by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Ann Giannell 

EveFgyear, hundreds of dilleient events visit the Ohio 
University campus to offer information and entertainment 
to Bobcat students and Athens communitv members. 
Recruited by organizations hke the University Program 
Council, the Black Student Cuhural Programming Board, 
the Student Alumni Board and various hall councils, these 
events vary in topic and t\pe. Ohio students dedicate 
endless hours even' week in order to make such events 
possible. In the 2006-2007 academic year, they brought 
in big names including commentators from VHl's Best 
Week E\ er, rapper-turned-realit\ -television-star Vanilla 
Ice, country^usic star Miranda Lambeit, former Project 
Runway contest Angela Kesler, and star of the Broadway 
play 'Rent' Anthony Rapp. As appreciated as national 
celebrities are, many students opt out of paying for tickets 
and instead attend the small scale events. Concerts are 
held almost every weekend on various stages throughout 
campus and uptown Athens. 

There are also speakers, seminars, comedians, art 
exhibits and workshops. The opening of Ohio University's 
new Baker University Center greatly increased the 
opportunity for such events to take place by offering 
another venue with greater capability. From the outside, 
Athens seems like the kind of area where there's "nothing 
to do." But for those 
who are willing to 
do a little searching, 
there are almost 
too many events to 
choose from. 




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School of Dance offers up a 
healthy dose of culture. 



Story by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Mandi Mellott 



When our parents send us otf to college, there are many 
things they expect. We are supposed to go to class, study 
hard, pass our tests and make the grade. But when we 
return home, they don't expect us to just be book smart. 
They expect us to be cultured, as well. For many college 
students, culture translates to knowing all 
the mles to every drinking game known to 
man. Luckily for Ohio University students, 
there seems to be an entire school 
dedicated simply to culture. The Ohio 
University School of Dance, a division of 
the College of Fine Arts, puts on dozens 
of concerts throughout the academic vear 
that undeniably broaden one's horizons. 
Although the dancers have been trained in 
traditional ballet, these performances are 
far from just another presentation of Swan 
Lake. 

Attending even a single concert offers 
amazing exposure to the kind of dance 
that is "modern" enough to make one tilt 
their head. Even during the dances that 
are a little difficult to understand, there is 
undeniable beauty, overwhelming grace, 
and enough culture to satisfy your parentsy 




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Students take on classic roles in front of their peers. 

Ston' by: Am\ Gianiiell 
Design b\ : Ashlee Dolan 

In addition to countless musical and performance acts to visit Ohio 
University, oui students showed off their talents to their family and friends. 
Observe The Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme is a new show by 
Frank McGuincss that was introduced at Ohio University by the School of 
Theater They also performed Time Of Your Life at Foiaim Theater in the RTV 
building. The Lost Flamingo Company perfoimed The Rocky Horror Picture 
Show at The Union. As the play went on, they had the movie playing 
in the background. As a part of Women's History Month the Lost 
Flamingo Company also performed The Vagina Monologues. 

One of the man\ acts that came to Templeton-Blackburn Alumni 
Memorial Auditorium's stage were the Aquila Theatre Company who 
presented students with a fi^esh lendition of William Shakespeare's 
classic Romeo and Juliet. A production of Man of La Mancha, w hich 
is the classic stor\ of Don Quixote, also graced the TBAMA stage. < 




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17 




WE'RE ALL IIOKIES ^ 

Ohio University students pause to offer 
support to our peers at Virginia Tech. 

Stor\ by: Sarah Hatmaker 

Design by: Am\ Giannell ^^fci^ 

""■' ach passing year spent iSlRSiis, il becomes 
Igly easy for us, as students, to lose ourselves 
_ tiio University version of tbe world. On April 
16, 2007, we were lorced out oi that mindset by a vei^ 
traaic set of events, whifihififoldcd over two liLindred 



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Scung-Hui Cho, a sti 



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"school violence" ret 



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modern U.S. history. 
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univcrsitie^hroughoLit the country, with heaitfclt 
displays oflfempassion and support. Within two 
davs, a candlelight vigil was held on College Green. 
Students gathered to celebrate the lives of those lost 
and to olTer condolences to the lar-reaching group 
of individuals alTected. President Roderick McDavis 
spoke to his students with earnest sympathy, "We 
may study on dilTerent campuses, we may teach on 
dilTerent campuses, but tonight we are with those 
at VT. We're all about expressing ourselves as a 
sinsle universitv communilv to another university 



communitv. 



the Virginia Tech massacre put life in peispective for 
college students nationwide. Situations like this often 
leave so many of us feeling helpless. As American 
college students, we are supposed to be the best and 
brightest of our generation. There must be something 
that can be done to prevent such horrific events. 
But in the initial days following such an occurrence, 
pausing to appreciate our 
blessings is all that we can 



(Ct OHIO 



Some may say it is naive 
and irresponsible to gel lost 
in the ease and simplicity of 
life in Athens. But when the 
outside world is stricken with 
such hatred and violence, I 
can only hope that evei-yone 
has a place like here to get 
lost in now and again. || 



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iome aspects of dorm life are so much more appreciated after moving off campus. 

i Ston b\ : Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Am\ Giannell 

I Ohio Universii\ requires that students hve in donns for their first two \ears. That rule, undeniabh, sucks. Come 
i)ring quarter ol any given student's sophomore year, and I can guarantee you they're dying to move off campus. But 
ke it from a girl w he's been out ol the dorms for almost an entire year, there are some pros and cons to both sides. 

Dining hall food can be prett>- temble. 

But so can things that come out of your own kitchen. 

Drinking in the dni-ms gets lame real quick. 

Rumor has it Nels( )n grab and gi > makes for decent hango\er food. 

One bathroom for every twent\ kids is not a hm ratio. 

Four or five roommates to one bathroom with no cleaning staff can get worse. 

The relationship between swiping a card and instantly receiving food should never be underestimated. 

There's a lot to be said lor lia\ing more than twehe square feet to yourself. 

Ha\ ing to clean more than twelve square feet is imnecessary. 

In no other situation is it completeK acceptable to leave your door propped open for strangers. 
' It's really fun to watch RA's try to ha\ e authority over people their own age. 

A randomly assigned roommate can easily turn into a randomly assigned enemy, 
i A friend who later beci )mes your roommate can lose their friend status verv quickly. 

There's always that one kid u ho forgets to unplug his alarm clock when he leaves for the weekend. 

Sometimes, there's a kid whose mom puts enough cookies in the care package for the entire floor 

Ha\ing to tiuTi down your music at ten o'clock for quiet hours kind of feels like still being at home. 

Not ha\ ing twenty-four hour quiet hours during finals week. 

Not having Catvision. 

Ha\ing to sleep with your window open because of the un-Godly temperature they set the heat at in the dorms. 

Sleeping \s ith twehe blankets duiing winter quarter because now you're paying your own heating bills. H 




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WHOl Ohio University Students, Faculty, Staff and Alumni 

Bobcats of all ages and from every corner of the country found themselves in 
Athens for annual Homecoming festivities. Like we've all come to expect and 
appreciate, the most noticed were the returning members of the Marching 1 10. 
They led all their fellow alumni in the annual parade uptown and entertained 
all during the halftime show on Saturday. 

W U AT: Back on the Bricks in '06 

While those of us who arc still stumbling over the busted up bricks on Court 
Street sometimes forget to see the beauty in it all, alumni were dying to Back 
on the Bricks. Taking that into consideration, the university chose that as the 
theme for this vear's celebration. 
WH^]^^: October 20-22 

The actual parade and game, in which the Bobcats beat out Buffalo 42-7, 
took place Saturday, but festi\ ities stretched throughout the entire weekend. 
The annual Yell Like Hell pep rally was held in Peden Stadium Friday night. 
And UPC brought in national recording artist Tyrone Wells for a Saturday 
evening concert at Howard Hall site. 

WHKilji:: Athens, Ohio 

Although a quick glance uptown or the attendance at the football game 
would instantly tell you it was homecoming weekend, alumni and students took 
advantage of the fortunate weather to spend time in all their favorite spots. 

WHY: You really need to ask? 

You know you'll still want to come back thirty years from 
now. Why should these alumni be any different? »* 





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ulticultural programs and organizations offer students a much needed sense of community. 

Story by: Lydia Gutierrez and Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Am\ Giannell 

College is supposed to be a home away from home. Ho\ve\er, if you aren't part of the dominant culture 
1 campus, the transition can be difficult. With thousands of miles between you and home, lonely can be 
understatement. But, Ohio Universitx is fortunate enough to be able to offer a sense of community to all 

its students, no matter what their cultural 
background. The combined effoils of the 
International Student Union, the Center for 
International Studies, Lindley Cultural Center, 
the Office of Multicultural Programs and all 
the student organizations they oversee, greatly 
contribute to the quality of life for Ohio's 
minoiity population. 

The goals of these organizations are reflected 
in the Multicultural Programs' mission 
statement: "The Office of Multicultural Programs 
seeks to provide a diverse range of programs and 
opportunities that are educational, recreational, 
social and cultural. Committed to supporting 
and promoting multicultural awareness, the staff 
develops programs that increase understanding 
and appreciation of cultural differences by 
familiarizing the campus community with the 
contributions and histories of African American, 
Hispanic/Latino American, Asian American, and 
Nati\e American cultures." 

Programs are sponsored in celebration of 
Black Histors' Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, 
Nati\'e American Heritage Month, Women's 
History Month, Martin Luther King Week and 

many other events. 

The 30 plus 
multicultural 
organizations on 
campus ha\ e helped 
a unique sub-culture 
on campus to thrive. 
"Coming from one 
small town to another 
made my transition 
easier," said sophomore 
Gloria Lomeli. "But 
when I found the Latino 
Student Union, I felt 
more at home."H 




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Halloween: We do our drinking together. 

Story by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Am\ Giannell 

"So, where do you go to school?" 

"Ohio University." 

"Oh, yeah. Go Buckeyes!" 

"No, not Ohio Stale, Ohio University. It's in Athens." 

"Ooh... you guys are the ones with that big Halloween party, right?" 

"Yeah, that's us." 

I've had that comei sation, or some version of it, more times 
than I can even remember. I'm not going to lie, at first it bothered 
me. I didn't come here because of Halloween or any other party. I 
was a Scripps kid, through and through. I wanted to be a serious 
journalist. Nt)l that I'xc completely abandoned that ambition or 
anything. We'll just sa> ihat my time here has relaxed my uptight 
tendencies a little. 

When the aforementioned conversation continues with, "So, 
what's it like down there, on Halloween, ya know?" I'm never quite 
sure what to say. Maybe that's because I've never spent Halloween 
at another school, so I have nothing to compare it to. Maybe it's 
because that weekend in October has become 
one of many street festivals in Athens. But 
I really believe my inability to describe the 
event is because of its nature. 

We are the college that complained when 
our party school rating fell. We are the 
university whose football coach drinks more 
than the football team. We are the girls who 
dress up our moms and parade them through 
the Court Street Crawl. We drink, we have fun 
and we're honest about it. 

So for the one night of the year when we 
all do our drinking together, in costumes, 
uptown, in front of horse mounted police... 
What am I supposed to say? f| 





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New student center offers upgraded facilities 
and increased opportunities for students. 

StoiA B\ : Sarali Hatmaker 
Design By: Am \ Giannell 

In March of 2004, construciii in crews broke ground on the new 
Jolin Calhoun Baker Universil\ Center Almost three years later, 
in January 2007, doors to that building were opened to the Ohio 
Uni\'ersity commimity. The fi\e-sloi'y slnacture cost the university 
$60 million dollars with a design that earned the facility mention 
in the 2006 Association of College Unions International book as a 
best practice. 

The new building gave upgraded facilities to Ohio University 
staples such as The Front Room, The Post, Student Senate, ACRN 
and Residence Life. Within Baker, there are also two art galleries, 
several sttid\' lounges, a computer lab, a ballroom, a theater 
and office space for select student organizations. Various dining 
options are offered through the large food court on the first floor 
and the fine dining restaurant Latitude 39: named after Athens' 
geographical location. 

The facility officiall\ opened on Februai-y 10, 2007 with an 
anay of grand opening celebrations. 

The old sttident center which held the same name, was 
completed in 1953, when the university's enrollment was just over 
five thousand students. Having been in use for over fifty years, 
the building was in less than pleasant condition and stnaggled to 
sen'e the needs of a student body, which had since tripled in size.K 





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iiAiiiat I'MVivitsiiY ri;M'i;i( 




BAKER UNIVERSITV CENTER 



WHO: Ohio University 

The entire Ohio Universit\ community gathered 
to celebrate the completion and official opening 
of the new student center President Roderick 
McDavis was joined by students from eveiy Ohio 
county, e\'eiy state and ever>- country represented on g 
campus for the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon. 
' WW >VW' -^^^^ Calhoun Baker University 
" "* * * • Center Grand Opening 
The five-stoiy building serves all the purposes 
of the previous student center and then some. 
Individual ceremonies were held for the dedication 
of the Honors Collegium, the first-floor terrazzo art 
installation and the Phi Beta Kappa clock located 
outside the fdurth-lloor entrance. Other dedications 
followed through out winter and spring quarters. 
WHK^^: February 12, 2007 
Although the building unofficially opened 
in January with the start of winter quarter, the 
ceremony wasn't until February. Ciews took the 
last month to smooth out all the final details and 
ensure the building was at its best on opening day. 
M1^I'^K;;J: l Park Place Athens, Ohio 
The center is located at the south end of Court 
Street where students can enter onto the fourth- 
floor A first-floor entrance is also located near Bird 
Ice Arena and Porter Hall. The building, which 
Ohio's administration has nicknamed the "Heart 
of Campus," provides a much-needed throughway 
linking West and College Greens. And it does this 
with the only set of escalators in Southeast Ohio. 
WHY* You really need to ask? 
Anyone who spent much time at all in the old 
student center knew its shortcomings all too well. 
The original Baker University Center served its 
puipose for many awhile 
but had taken quite a 
beating over the years. 
The university now 
plans to renovate the old I 
building for use by the 
E. W. Scripps School of 
Journalism. 1^ 





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W!5i*: MASS 

MASS is an intemationallv renowned group of artists, musicians, composers and choreographers who perform as 
a collective ensemble with large-scale musical instmments including: the Earth Haip, the Aquatar, Wing Haips and a 
series of dmm sculptures like the Drumbrella. 

WHIT: Earth Harp 

In the fall ol 1 999, Bill Close, who now sen'es as the artistic 
director for MASS, invented the Earth Harp. It is the world's 
largest stringed instrument; an architectural structure which 
relies on its surrounding environment to operate. 

WHliX: Saturday, February 10, 2007 

Bill Close led se\ eral hour-long demonstrations and 
discussions throughout the weekend. The Earth Harp's stay at 
Ohio University ended with a full-length feature show Saturday 
evening. 

WHJiilji: John Calhoun Baker University Center 

The bass of the Earth Harp was positioned in the second 
floor lounge of Baker University Center. The harp's strings were 
attached to the fifth lloor south banister and weighted to play 
in tune. 

WHY° Baker Center Grand Opening 

The university brought in MASS and the Earth Haip as 
a part of the grand opening celebrations for the new Baker 
University Center H 




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It's fantastic! It really is 
fun because you get to 
see a lot of people. * f 

'. I -Kels\ Grefe, 

Senior, Spanish 

I 1:: ■■ 

* 'it's so big! There doesn't 
seem like there is a lot to do 
besides eat, play pool and 
ping pong. ) } 

-Laura Rosario, Sophomore, 
Psychology/Physical Therapy 







^^Ifs actualh the first time I 
have been here in the food 
court! Its location on the hill 
is \ en convenient. 

\ 

-Autumn Hauber, 

Freshman, Undecided 



It's great, I like all the places 

to eat and that you can just J^ ^ 

come play pool whenever, . 

not like at Ping. 

-Brett Hummer, 
.Junior, Business 




','* It's a good alternative for people 

' who are looking for something 

lo do on the weekends. ' ' 

-Suzanne McCandlish, 
Junior, Civil Engineering 



It's reallv ct)nvenient and a 
good place lo go that is not 
lar off campus. ) I 

-Julie Mailowe, 
Sophomore. Business 



IMKRR I'XIVERSITl' CENTER 



39 




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I IIltftlTfin I K/IKS A\n SMII KS 



4,500 Bobcats officially become 
Ohio alumni in the matter of hours. 



Story by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by; Am\ Giannell 



BefoMeven showing up to campus for the first time, every 
college freshman has a pretty good idea of what to expect 
from Ohio University. The campus is gorgeous, the sports 
teams are decent (some are even pretty good), the degree 
programs are respectable and endless in possibility, the 
dorms and the food are equally terrible, and the weekends 
make-up for any and all shortcomings. Fifteen minutes 
on the school website will lead you to an endless array of 
statistics to help put eveiything in perspective: enrollment, 
established in, majors offered, cost, and the name of 
practically every individual to ever step foot on campus. But 
there is nothing on Ohio.edu, on facebook.com, in any copy 
of The Post, or in any book- even this one- that can begin 
to describe the way this campus feels. And 
that feeling only truly comes into perspective 
for Bobcat seniors. The excitement of each 
first you experience on this campus is 
trumped only by its respective last. Your last 
football game, your last Halloween, your last 
homecoming parade, your last Palmer Fest, 
vour last Relay for Life, and yes, even your 
last class means something more. 

On June 10, 2007, over 4,500 Bobcats 
made what could veiy well have been their 
last visit to the Convocation Center Each 
in their own way, they said their goodbyes 
and their thank yous. Through tears and 
smiles, they realized the full extent of a 
decision made over four years ago. Together, 
the class of 2007 accomplished one of the 
most difficult things about being at Ohio 
University- walking away. t^ 




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Bobcats have most successful 
season in almost 40 years. 

Story by: Brianna Voight 
Design by: Amy Giannell 

The Ohio Bobcats scored their way into the hearts of fans during 
their 2006 football season. The season, which included both triumphs 
and heartaches, was a roller-coaster-ride for players, coaches and fans 
alike. 

The 2006 season included an impressive nine wins dtning the 
regular season, as well as a win against Central Michigan in the Mid- 
American Conference championship game. 

The season included several nail-biters including an on the road 16- 
10 win against Eastern Michigan. A similar match-up against Miami 
ended with a 34-24 victory for the Bobcats. 

The team, which njshed for 2,020 yards and threw 
for 1 ,639 yards, a\ eraged over 20 points per game. The 
Bobcats scored 33 lotichdowns during the course of the 
season and completed 13 of their 18 field-goal attempts. 

Fans showed their Bobcat pride as they came out in 
droves to watch the team play, with a total attendance 
for the season reaching well over 80,000 people. 

The Bobcat's roller-coaster season ended with a 
disappointing 28-7 loss to Southern Mississippi in the 
GMAC bowl. H 





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45 




Is it possible for a 28-7 season-ending loss 
to still feel like going out on a high note? And 
what if that loss is in front of over 38,000 fans 
and broadcast on national television? Is it still a 
good day? 

In the case of Ohio's loss to Southern 
Mississippi in the GMAC Bowl, January 7, 2007 
was still a very good day. For those who know 
Bobcat football history, participating in a bowl 
game feels as good to us as winning a bowl 
game feels to Ohio State fans. 

The 2007 season was undeniably the best 
seen by Bobcat fans in recent history. In 

fact, Ohio held a 9-5 record, 
' their best since 1968, which, 

coincidentally was also the 
last time the Bobcats appeared 
in a bowl game. 
^ Earning 7 wins 

jf^ '"■ in the MAC and 

-> their first MAC 

I i East Division 

a '^ Championship, 

I Ohio football 

was all about the 

^^||tl <iMACBOWL 

IP ^^ Sarah Hatmaker 



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Ohio Volleyball makes it four in a row in 2006. 

Stoi-y by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Am\ Giannell 



F-^our years ago, the athletic 
department at Ohio University 
made a single decision that 
has since changed the entire 
volleyball program and made 
significant advances for all 
female Bobcat athletes. Geoff 
Cailston was hired as head 
coach in 2003 and instantly 
transformed Ohio into the 
strongest team in the Mid- 
American Conference. As his 
first fteshman class prepares 
to graduate, their career with 
Carlston is commonly being 
described as a dynasty. Since 
2003, the team has held a 
118-15 record. They have won 
the MAC regular season and 
tournament championship 
each season. The team has 
also been making appearances 
on the national athletic scene; 
they are becoming regulars 
at the NCAA tournament. In 

2006, the 'Cats fell to Kentucky in the first round of 
the tournament. 

The Bobcats also have the longest home winning 
streak to boast about: 45 consecutive games dating 
back to September of 2003. "[Home games are] so 
much better because your fans ai"e there and you have 
home court advantage," junior Stephanie Blackburn 
described. "Evei^yone is yelling at the other team and 
not you. And it's just so familiar playing there." 

As a result of their success, the women are 
earning mass support ftom the student body and the 
administration. In 2006, they set a season attendance 
record of well over 1 1 ,000. "The whole athletic 
program has been really supportive. Kirby's been 
great. And the president comes to our matches and 
gives us pep talks. We feel support from everywhere: 
the community, the teachers. So for us, it's been a 
really positive e.xperience," said senior Michaele 
Blackburn. 

With confident captains and strong freshman 
recruits, the Bobcats are prepared to continue their 
successes in the 2007 season, j^ 



4S 




iiuriesyt/f.i 




VOLinVBALL 




50 



V()l.l.i;VBAIX 





Michaele Blackburn 

Libera, #10 

2006 Team Co-Captain 
Senior, Pre-Dentistry 
Ursuline Academy 
Cincinnati, OH 

"I feel like we were 
groomed to be athletes. Both 
our parents are athletic. And 
our dad had us bumping 
since about age four They 
tried to give us every 
opportunity they could to 
achieve in sports and get us 
on the best teams possible." 






Stephanie Blackburn 

Outside Hitter, #3 
2007 Team Co-Captain 
Junior, Pre-Medicine 
Ursuline Academy 
Cincinnati, OH 

"I think that having each 
other definitely helps us 
perform athletically. I'm a 
really competitive person, 
so I think anywhere I 
would have gone, I would 
have been [this intense.] 
But just being with my 
sister has always helped. 
And Michaele's sweet at 
defense." 



BMCKBURN SISTERS 



VOLIEYBAI.1 



51 




SKroivn/iHv KFrrr'rs 



■f 



Program cuts leave Ohio's running program incomplete. 

Sioo by: Ki ista Bradley 
Design by: Ann Giannell 



1 



"To have a sucLessful progiam, a school needs to have both a cross country team and a track team," sophomore cross 
country runner Shamus Eaton said. In tlie same fashion as Bowling Green and Toledo, Ohio University's administratior 
has decided to cut its men's indoor and outdoor track and field program. The athletic department's decision to cut the 
team after the 2006-2007 season has affected the entire running program at Ohio. Currently, the Bobcat Cross Countn 
and Track teams aie one; team members train in both programs and compete in both distance and track meets. The 
combined programs create greale-r unity between 
team members, a general cohesi\ cness with the 
girls' program, and ilie benefit of keeping nmners 
in top physical shape. 

Although many team members are deciding 
to stay at Ohio, a number of Bobcat runners 
are looking to transfer to schools \\ ilh complete 
running programs. "There is a chance that 
everyone may be back because it is emotionally 
and financially hard to leave. Also, this year we 
were one of the top teams in the [Mid-American 
Conference]. And that means a lot for next 
season's success," Eaton said. 

One reason for the cross country team's success 
in the MAC- overall the number three MAC 
team at the All-Ohio meet and 17th place at the 
NCAA Great Lakes Regional - was due to its large 
number of freshman recruits. "We had a huge 
class of freshmen with lots of potential," Eaton 
said. "The year was about the fi-eshmen." i^ 





52 



MEN'S ClUtSS COIJM'KV 




MEIVS CROSS COUNTRV 




'itriesy ijfTi 



WOMEN'S CROSS COIJIVTUY 





Returning athletes and strong 
freshman class propel women's 
cross country to first in the MAC. 

Stoi\ by: Danielle Bukxic 
Design by: Amy Giannell '^ ' 

The 200b women's cross conntiA' team 
flourished this past tall, with several returning 
kc\ runners, and a freshman class that had a 
major impact on the team. The season started 
off strong, w ith a first place finish at the 
Mel Brodt huitational at F^owling Green. In 
October, thc\ defeated nimicious Ohio teams, 
including ri\'al Ohio State, at the All-Ohio 
Championships, again coming in first place. 

The women continued to dominate as 
ihey took home first place at this year's 
Mid-American Conference Championship, 
improving from fourth place in 2005. Junior 
Carime Reinharl led the team with a first place 
Imish in the 5K race, with a time of 20:02.90. 
Four other Bobcats, senior Andrea Maas, 
freshmen Kari Summers and Annie Beecham, 
and sophomore Rachel Beakes, were among 
the top 1 5 placers. Finally, the women 
competed at the NCAA Great Lakes Regional 
and finished eighth. Reinhart was the fastest 
MAC i\mner, placing 19th. Also placing in the 
top 75 were Maas, Summers, Beecham, and 
sophomore Julia Weisenbom. To top off 
the Bobcat's successful season, coaches 
Clay Calkins received the MAC Coach of 
the Year Award. The women showed great 
improvement this season, and the future 
looks just as bright. W 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUVTRY 



/irniFVFuiFJV r ami i r/igfi>y ^ 

Ohio Soccer's successful season overshadowed by loss of teammate. 

Story by: Eniilie Schneider and Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: A^lliee Dolan 

The women's soccer team had an eventful season as the team 
experienced sc\ cral great wins and suffered one heartbreaking loss. Junior 
Sarah Merritt died unexpectcdl\ over spring break. Merritt was one of 
llie soccer team's best finishers, using her speed to get behind opposing 
delenses. The team will greatly miss her presence on the field. 

Before being marked by tragedy, the Bobcats were celebrating a rather 
successfid 2006 season. Ohio won si.x more contests this year than the 
2005 season, ending with a regular season record of 9-9-1 (7-3-1 in the 
Mid-American Conference). The women posted wins in their final three 
regular season games, earning the second-seed in the MAC tournament. 
The tournament, however, proved to be a matter of upsets, as all four top- 
seeded teams lost in the quarterfinal round. The Bobcats ultimately fell to 
Northern Illinois, 2-0. 

The Bobcats also had several impressive freshmen who added talent 
and power to the already strong team. The newcomers were Amy Lower, 
Rachael Goulding and Dominique Wright. Lower was named to the All- 
MAC Freshmen Team; Goulding received All-MAC First Team honors 
toward the end of the season. And Wright made a mark on the team with a 
5-4-1 record in goal and 53 saves. 

Although this season was a new beginning for these three freshmen, it 
also meant a final chapter for the team's seniors. Tiffany Horvath and Amy 
Switzer Horvath finished the season with her name in the Ohio record 
books, ranking fourth place all-time in career goals, career points and 
career starts. Sixteen career assists places her at number seven in Bobcat 
history. Switzer leaves the team with her dedication and undeniable 
strength. In 2007, she 
will be returning to 
her team as a graduate 
assistant. 

Despite ending 
the season with that 
disappointing loss 
in the tournament, 
the team will return 
next season with its 
powerful players. 
Looking ahead toward 
next season, head 
coach Stacy Strauss 
said, "I feel that we 
are at a place with 
our campus and our 
facilities and the 
support that we get, 
that we should win 
the conference." S 



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CeitrUsy of The Post 




The Ohio Women's Soccer team, along with the rest of the Ohio 
University community, suffered a great loss on March 21, 2007. 
Junior forward Sarah Merritt passed away while enjoying her spring 
break on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. The education major 
from Tipp City, just north of Dayton, fell from a fifth-floor balcony 
while trying to climb to another hotel room. She had played in all of 
the Bobcats 19 games thus far and had participated in 49 over her 
3-year career at Ohio. 

The player and friend was honored by her teammates on several 
occasions throughout the rest of the 2007 season. A memorial service 
was held in late April along with the establishment of the Sarah 
Merritt Ohio Soccer Memorial Fund. The women participated in the 
Gridiron Gallop 5k Run (presented by Diagnostic Hybrids as a part of 
the second annual Bobcat Blitz) just a month after their teammate's 
passing, with all proceeds benefitting the memorial fund. 

"She was the social engine of the team; she always encouraged the 
players to get together off the field," remembers Head Coach Stacy 
Strauss. "She was easy to talk to and was usually one of the first ones 
to work with younger players." 

Ohio soccer fans will undoubtedly miss Merritt's presence on the 
field during the 2008 season, which would have been her senior year. 
However, Sarah's family and friends hold the greater heartache, in 
missing her for all the days yet to come. 



O _ 

Hesyef The Pest 



•••• 



SAKAII MKRIU'IT 



SOCCER 



57 



Miwixti n\ nil 



■► 




Field hockey racks up accomplishments 
for Ohio women's athletics. 

Stoi^y by: Krista Bradley 
Design by: Am\ Giannell 

"Our mindset was positive going into [the Mid-American 
Conference Championship]. Knowing that we had won the regular 
season, we had no doubts... Near the end of the game, we thought 
we had it a httle too early. [Ball Slate] scored to tie it up with 37 
seconds left in the game, so we had to go into overtime. This was a 
scary feeling, but we still knew that we would find a way to finish 
it off and we did," Ohio University Field Hockey player Celine 
McNamara said. In a year of many Ohio women's athletic successes, 
field hockey has been no exception with accomplishments both on 
and off the field 

The team, comprised of 19 athletes, linished the season with a 13- 
9 record o\'erall. In theii fined regulai season game, the women beat 
out defending conference champions, Central Michigan. Led by Neil 
Macmillan, the 2006 MAC Coach of the Year, this win solidified the 
Bobcats' conference record of 8-2, which secured them the regular 
season title. This year's squad posted the best records since 2001. 

Off the field, eight players earned recognition on the National 
Field Hockey Coaches Association Division I National Academic 
Squad. The 2002 team, with nine honorees, was the only 
team to be recognized with more academic honors in Ohio 
Field Hockey history. 

Teamwork played a major role in the 2006 seasons 
successes. The players were also encouraged to set 
priorities outside of the team, such as individual 
achievements, family and academics. Along with the 
stressed importance of sportsmanship, these values helped 
to set the tone for the season. "I felt that our attitude was 
much different than it has been in the past, and we all 
believed in one another and that we were going to win," 
McNamara said. "I felt that all the hard work has paid 
off, and it was a great note to end a career on. For the 
underclassmen, it is just the beginning." || 





CoHirifsy of TUc Past 




Courtesy pfi 



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59 




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60 



MARCniN«i 1 10 



% 




lUlYimh THE BRICKS 



The most exciting band in the 
land proves it to Alabama 



t 




Slor\' by: Krisla Bradley 
Design by; Ani\ Giannell 

"We received coverage on a national scale and T.V. 
exposure," Ohio L niversitv' student and Marching 1 10 Field 
Commander Malt Mattox said. For a college band in loiral 
Southeast Ohio, the 2006-2007 season provided members with 
amazing opportunities. The Marching 1 10 tra\e!ed with the 
Bobcats to the GAIAC Bowl in Mnbile, Alabama, where the 
L ni\ crsity of Southern Mississippi ultimately defeated Ohio. 
Al( mg with the game's half-time show, the band performed in 
the cit\s annual Mai di Gras Parade. In fact, the trip marked 
only the band's second bowl performance in histor> ; not since 
1968 had Bobcats traveled to such a championship. 
In the past, The 1 10 has performed in the Macy's 
Thanksgiving Da> Parade, a Walt Disney World parade, 
and half-time show s during Cleveland Browns' games. The 
band also has annually performed its music since 1974 at 
the Ohio Theatre in Columbus. The November show, in 
which the ensemble replayed all its music for the 2006-2007 
season, is similar to the Varsity Show perfomied in the 
Templeton-Blackbum Alumni Memorial Auditorium each 
\ear. Throughout the season, routines are usually recycled, 
according to Mattox. Fans can expect to see the same 
routines at games and special performances, such as parades 
and shows. 

Much preparation earns the band its high-exposure 
appearances. The Marching 1 10 stri\es to differentiate itself 
through melodies and harmonies, according to Mattox. 
Daily practices, a summer training 
week followed by auditions for new 
members, and ri\al competition with 
other schools, such as Ohio State 
University, drive the 205 musicians and 
flag corps members led by Dr. Richard 
Suk. Originally, 1 10 referred to the 
number of members; now it represents 
the amount of effort - 1 lO^'c - expected 
from each member 

In addition, the Marching 1 10 
prides itself for the camaraderie and 
brotherhood felt amongst its members. 
A member of the Marching 1 10 is a 
member for life. This is showcased 
every year with the participation of 
alumni in the Homecoming parade 
and half-time show. "There is a sense 
of pride and respect that you went 
through this together," Mattox said. V 



'iaycfT. 



H.4RCDI\<; 110 



61 



nmn films ^ 

Dance team members willing to financially 
support their courtside endeavors. 



SliiiA [^\ ; Sarah Hatmaker 
Design By: Mandi Mellott 

The 2006-2007 Ohio Dance Team consists of fiiteen 
members, who are led by three captains: junior Laura Sobek 
and seniors Amanda Way and 
Alhson Marshall. The program 
is student-rim and affiliated 
with the Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics. The 
girls are responsible for their 
own choreographv, practices, 
uniforms and funding. 
The team performs on the 
sidelines of all home football 
games and courtside during 
all men's home basketball 
games. The squad can also 
be seen performing at special 
university and community 
events. The dance team only 
travels to the Mid-American 
Conference Men's Basketball 
Tournament in Cleveland at 
the Quicken Loans Arena. 
Auditions for the squad 
are held in September and all 
members are required to have 
previous dance experience. |t 




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62 



DANCI! TliAM 




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DANCE TEAM 



63 



11. ..H... I.. .11... ^ 



Ohio cheerleaders sen e as Hnk 
between the field and the fans. 

Story By: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design Bv: Mandi Mellott^^ 



*.>; 



For the 2006-2007 athletic season, a seventeen 
member cheering squad supported Ohio University 
Football and both the Men's and Women's Basketball 
teams. Ohio Cheerlcading features both male and 
female athletes. The squad can be seen on the sidelines 
of both regular season and tournament 
games. All members do not travel to every 
away game. Smaller squads are selected 
to coincide with uni\ ersity regulations 
and budget. A special performance 
squad, which travels annually to national 
competitions, is assembled from current 
team members. 

The cheerleaders greatly contribute 
to the enthusiasm of Ohio fans, often 
times leading the 0-Zone in chants. 
Male cheerleaders are also a part of the 
teams' entrances as they circle the field 
or stadium with Ohio flags. One of the 
squad's traditions is post-scoring end zone 
push-ups. 

Upperclassmen for Ohio's squad are 
chosen in May of the previous year 
and freshman are 
permitted to tiy-out 
in the early weeks of 
fall quarter Upon their 
selection to the squad, 
upperclassmen attend 
cheering camps in 
late May and return 
to campus two weeks 
early for football season 
preparation. ^ 



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66 



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■f 



Four varsity programs to lose funding after 2007 seasons. 

Storv bv; Sarah Halniaker ' a 

Design by: Am\ Giannell "m 

According to \CAA regulatiims, student athletes can spend no more than 
twenty hours pei week and foiii hours per day on activities directly related to 
theii' sport. In reality, the majority of athletes ha\e probably already exceeded 
this lime limit b\ any gi\en Wednesday. But even if you look at the NCAA's ideal 
situation, twenty hours per week, that's still more time than most of us spend in 
class. And they do this, without complaint, simply for the sake of the sport they 
love and the university they so proudly represent. So, when four varsity teams had 
their sport ripped (Hii from under them in Januaiy the anger and disappointment 
they felt was nothing shy of appropriate. 

On January 25, 2007, Director of Athletics Kirby Hocutt announced to the 
public tiiat following tlie completion of the 2007 
seasons, lour programs would no longer receive 
varsity funding from tiie university: men's indoor 
and outdoor track and lield, men's s\\ imming 
and di\ing, and women s lacrosse. Jiisi hours 
before informing the pi ess and public, the athletic 
department informed the athletes in back-to-back, 
hour-long meetings with each team. Needless to say, 
the news was received as poorly as it was delivered. 
"At the meeting, people started storming out. So 
right away we weren't there as a team," junior 
swimming and diving team co-captain Tyler Post 
explains. "I think only three or four people stayed 
the whole time." 

Of the programs affected, two were well into their 
seasons when the announcement was made: men's 
indoor track and field, and men's swimming and 
diving. The 2007 women's lacrosse spring season 
was cancelled due to the number 
of athletes who chose to forgo 
this season in order to retain 
eligibility. 

Post explained the way in 
which his team dealt with the 
initial shock, "Ever-yone was 
by themselves for awhile. But 
then that same night our coach 
called us, the captains, and we 
got the team together And we 
had a meeting. Greg [Werner, 
head coach] basically told us how 
things went down. We talked 
about, briefly, where we went 
from here; but we were all still 
really shocked. He just told us 
how to handle ourselves. So that 
night, at nine o'clock, I remembei 
in the weight room, it was dark 
and we were all together."j( 




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Frerichs represents team at NCAA 
Wrestling Championship. 



Ston' by: Sarah I latmaker 
Design by: Amy Ciiannell 



The highlight ol tlie 2006-2007 Bobcat Wrestling season was the 
team's representation by sophomore Jake Frerichs at the NCAA 
Wrestling Championship. Frerichs' second place finish at the Mid- 
American Conference Championship earned him a wild caid bid to 
travel to Auburn HilK, Michigan in March. Wrestling at 
157 pounds, Frerich laced stiff competition in his first 
match and ultimatel\ lell to Nebraska's Chiis Oliver. The 
Bobcat, who posted a 19-8 regular season record, was 
then placed in the consolation bracket where he again 
lost, this time to West Virginia's ,Zac Fryling. "It's just 
a different ball game \\hen you get up here," Frerichs 
explained. "It's the best of the best. I got caught on m\ 
back earl\ in the first match and just gi )i out wrestled in 
the second match." Although a loss is aK'i ays tough to 
take, Frerichs was able to put things in perspective and 
find an upside. He went on to say how the experience 
would help him next year. 

Two other Bobcat wrestlers earned the opportunity 
to compete on a national level during the post-season. 
Redshirt freshman Jacob Ison and 
true ft-eshman Joe Tymoszczuk 
traveled to Akron in late April. 
Each took seventh place in their 
respective weight classes at the 
University Greco National Wrestling 
Championship. The competition 
brings together some of the counti-y's 
best collegiate wrestlers for freestyle 
and Greco-Roman style matches. 

As a team, the Bobcats also racked 
up significant accomplishments this 
season. Head Coach Joel Greenlee led 
the men to a 16-8 overall record; the 
most dual season wins in his 10 years 
at Ohio. Although the 'Cats only went 
2-3 in the MAC and finished fourth 
out of six at the MAC Championship, 
huge progress was made overall. 
Such improvements, along with 
a strong recruiting class for next 
season, the team has much potential 
to meet in 2007-2008. #. 




L\'i<ii£Syi!l'l 




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WRESTLISIG 



SF/lSriN OF TFIFKIM ■ IO\ ^ 

Men's basketball commemorates its 1 00th anniversary. 

Stoi-y by: Brittany Elsden 
Design by: Ashlee Dolan 

During 2007, Ohio Men's Basketball celebrated, in as many 
ways as possible, its 100th annixeisai-N. The Bobcats devoted 
multiple games during the season in commemoration of past 
successes. Three Ohio Basketball icons were honored and their 
numbers retired during Legends Night. As a part of Throwback 
Day, the 1963 Elite Eight 'Cats were paid tribute. Finally, all 
Bobcat basketball alumni were recognized during Century 
Celebration Da>. 

Not only was it a remarkable season lor the Bobcat team, 
with an o\erall record of 19-13 (9-7 in the Mid-American 
Conference), but the '07 squad reached some veiy impressive 
individual milestones. Senior Sonny Troutman and junior Leon 
Williams joined the 1 ,000-point league, an achievement met 
by less than 30 pla\ ei s in Ohio's history. Troutman ended his 
career as a Bobcat setting numerous Ohio records, including 
259 career steals. Senior Whitney Davis broke another record 
with the most minutes played in a single season. For the first 
time in school histoid, fi\e players (Williams, Troutman, Davis, 
Jerome Tillman and Bubba Walther) each scored at least 350 
points in a single season. Tillman was the only Bobcat to be 
named First Team All-MAC. Williams received Second Team 
All-MAC honors, as well as being named a MAC East Division 
Player of the Week. Troutman received All-MAC Honorable 
Mention for the second time in his career as a Bobcat. Head 
Coach Tim O'Shea reached individual success in 2007: his 
100th career victor\'; which was fitting for such a memorable 
anniversary. 

The Bobcats' regular season ended with a loss to Buffalo. A 
win over Bowling Green in the first round allowed the team to 
advance to the MAC Tournament quarterfinals where they fell 
to Miami. |( 




70 



MKiV'S lUNUIi'l'IMI.I, 




•n 



A new head coach helps the Bobcats 
make the most of the 2006-2007 season. 

Ston by: Sai ali Hatmaker 
Design by: Ash lee Dolan 

Taking a note from the success of Ohio Volleyball since 2003, the 
women's basketball team acquiied a new coach for the 2006-2007 
season leading to major improvements in the program. Sylvia Crawley 
led the Bobcats to their first winning season since 1997-1998 with 
an overall record of 18-12 (10-6 in the Mid-American Conference). 
Crawley, a graduate of the Uni\ crsity of North Carolina and a 
former WNBA pla\er, replaced L\ iin Bria who resigned shoitly 
after the completion of the previous season. Crawley, a native 
of Steubenville, Ohio, spoke at a press conterence in April of 
2006 about her relationship with the sport, "Through the vehicle 
of basketball, I've gone all around the world, and I've been an 
ambassador of Ohio. I'm extremeh excited about coming back here 
to give other young ladies the same opportunities that I had." 

Things are looking up for the 2007-2008 season as well. The 'Cats 
are only graduating one senior this season, Domenica Silva, who 
finishes her career ranked third in the Ohio record books with 54 
career blocks. In only one season together, Silva earned a great deal 
of respect horn her coach, though. Following Silva's linal regular 
season game, Crawley said, "I'm very proud of her. This is a player 
who, times really got hard on her. There were times when she just 
wanted to quit. She sucked it up for her teammates." 

Ohio ended their season with a disappointing loss to Eastern 
Michigan, 79-69, in the quarterfinals of the MAC tournament. But 
afterwards, Crawley put things in perspective for her team and 
redirected their focus to ne.xt year, •^^Ki •fw-rr- -'^-w -a i mr^ 

telling them, "We had a great season HHH^.^^^ •* IB T^^ Bm 

and it was definitely something we K3W^ P^P^'_*^^ jff^ ^ 

can hang our hats on, but I want mX^ ^'''^^^ ''^i^' ■ r^ 

us to remember the feeling we are ^^^^^^g^ ^B ^ ^Tm^ 

feeling right now so we can have some | iH||]^^^^B|^Sl ^ "'^H 
motivation for next year" ^ ^^^^H^^^^^^BF >^ ^^^8 



L^uticsy ef rbe Pest 



72 



WOMEN'S BASIiKIUALL 





WONK'S R4SKETB.4LL 



73 



■ 



SAVK OHIO 



* 



Program cuts define men's 
swimming and diving season. 

Story By: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design Mandi Mcllott 

"I guess my claim to fame, is ihat I was the last Bobcat 
to sw im," junior T\ ler Post recalled the last few moments 
of his Ohio swimming career. For Post and the rest of the 
men's swimming and diving team, the 2007 Mid-American 
Conference Championship was more than just the end of a 
season. In January, the athletic department announced that 
four varsity sports programs would lose their funding at the 
conclusion of the present academic \ ear. 

The announcement, which came only da\s before the 
Bobcats last regular season meet, resulted in the teain 
receiving more support, ft'om more directions than the inen 
could ha\e ever expected. Post rememliered, "It was nice not 
having just the parents and other swimmers, or even just the 
other sports behind us. We had a lot of the regular student 
body behind us. And it kind of went into a lot of directions, 
with our administration, the uni\ersity in general. So people 
from all those different areas came together and it just so 
happens that we were the people they came to. It made it a 
lot easier and it made us want to fight even harder." 

And fight they did. Within days, a movement simply 
refened to as 'Save Ohio' swept the university campus. 
Rallies were held, a website was launched, the wall was 
painted. "We never said, 'Our sport is cut. This is our last 
meet,'" Post explained. "It was always, 'If this is our last 
meet...'" 

A month passed between the press conference that shook 
their worlds and the MAC Championship, 
which was seen, quite possibly, as that last 
meet. The three-day event ended in a scene 
that would rival even the best sports film. 
Andrew Belton, Cy Moser and Luke Herlehy 
joined Post for the final event, the 400-yard 
fieestyle relay. "For the last race, [our coach] 
wanted us to pick who represented us," Post 
said. With the start of the event, a 'Save Ohio' 
chant also began. In the three minutes the 
relay lasted, the chant morphed into a simple 
'OU' and was eventually backed by the entire 
crowd. "Somehow I got to be the leg, the last 
person. I was coming out to [the chant], and 
that was really emotional," Post concluded. 

The men placed third that day. They held a 
5-2 record (2-2 MAC) in their final season. But 
maybe, when it comes down to it, numbers 
aren't really what matters. (^ 




Courtesy . ■' 



MKiVS SWIM « IMVK 




MEN'S SWIM & niVE 



75 




76 



WOMKIV'S SWIM & niVK 





,*> 




rn-vn svnm 

Women's swimming and diving team 
stands by their male teammates. 

Stoiy B\ : Krista Bradlex 
Design B>: Mandi Mellott 

"E\en tliough the university has a 'women's 
team' and a men's team,' \^e are not two 
separate teams. We are one. We consider 
ourselves a eo-ed sport. Witliout both teams, 
we are not nearly as strong of a group," 
freshman swimmer Ashle\ Wiill said. The 
2006-2007 women's swimming and diving 
leam's season has been propelled by Ohio 
I niversity's administrative decision to cut the 
men's swimmiiiy and diving piogram. 

As the women s season came to a close \s ith 
a 10-3 record and a 6-2 mark in the Mid- 
American Conference, one of the defining 
moments was the team's last chance to 
cheer on the male team. Months of training, 
coaching, and dual meets with the men led up 
to their final meet- the MAC Championship. 
"After the final heat of the 400-vard free relays, 
one of the other men's teams started a "Save 
Ohio' chant that spread throughout the entire 
facility. The chant turned into an "OU" chant 
w ith e\er>body in the stands making the OU 
motions w ith their arms, h is safe to say that 
every single girl from the [Ohio] women's team 
was in tears at this point," Wulf said. 

The elimination of the co-ed program will 
affect team goals, atmosphere, and potential 
competition with other schools. "It will affect 
our training because the men provide a more 
competiti\e atmosphere in the pool. Also, the 
loss will affect a lot of our team traditions," 
Wulf continued. "With the cuts, our ability 
to reciTiit female swimmers will not be as 
successful since the cohesixeness of the 
[combined] program was such a big attraction 
for our team. Many of the girls would not be 
lieie if there was not a men's team. When I was 
being recruited by schools...! refused to look 
at any schools that did not have a program 
with both men and women." 



vtojofTkcPut 



WOMEN'S •iWIM & DIVE 



77 



TWO OUT OF thrij:ij: aix^t bad 

-Ohio Hockey has another successful season, the 
ACHA Championship remains out of reach, though. 

Stoi->- by; Kiista Bradley 
Design b\ : Ashlee Dolan 

"Playing in llie game, we never thought we were going to lose," 
Ohio Universil\ Hockey pla\er Brandon Steffek said about the 
team's loss in the first round of the 2006-2007 American Collegiate 
Hockey Association National Championship. "Until the last minute 
of the game we all still felt that we were going to win. ..Once 
I \1ichigan-Deaibom] scored the game winning goal, it just felt like 
m\ heart was ripped out of m\ chest." 

The Ohio Hockey team traveled to the ACHA tournament in 
search of their fillli national title in 1 3 \ears. As the No. 2 seed, the 
Bobcats lost 3-2 in o\erlime to No. 15 Michigan-Dearborn. The loss 
placed Ohio in the consolation bi acket where the team e\'entually 
lost 7-2 to Oklahoma. 

Despite the upset at the championship, the team met the majority 
of its goals for the season. "Eveiy \ car we have three goals: to win 
the regular season [Central States Collegiate Hockey League] title, 
the CSCHL tournament, and the ACHA national tournament," 
Steffek said. Led by Head Coach Dan Morris, the team finished 
the season with a 30-12 record and captured its fourth consecutive 
regular season title. 

The Ohio hockey team's success is made sweeter by its large fan 
base. Since its 1958 creation, the team has mostly been a club sport. 
"I think it is awesome that even though students have to pay [to 
see us], they still come and support us. Sometimes it is hard to be 
a club spoit because we do not get the respect that a NCAA athlete 
would get, but I guarantee you we work just as hard if not harder 
than a varsity team," Steffek 
said. "There is nothing better 
than playing in front of our 
peers every Friday and Saturday 
night at Bird Arena. Without our 
fans, playing hockey would not 
be the same." ^ 



I 




CcurUsygf'i 




Ccuriesyot 



78 




CMiia^ cfj)K Past 



HOCKEY 



79 



i.iCHT AMtiiVfiS'r 'rnii! h/ihkjvkss 



^ 




Ohio completes a rather dim season with a few strong performances 
that could point to a more successful venture in 2008. 

Story by: Suiah Halmakcr 

Design by: Amy Giannell 

First baseman Marc Krauss shed a little bit of light 
on a rather dim season for Oliio baseball. The Bobcats 
finished their 2007 season with an overall record of 
23-31, 8-19 in the Mid-American Conference. Krauss, 
however, became only the second Ohio player to ever 
earn MAC Freshman of the Year honors. He was the 
first Ohio freshman ever to be named to the All-MAC 
First Team. Krauss was very strong offensively this 
season, as he led the Bobcats in hitting (.369), home 
runs (8), doubles (19), total bases ( 1 14), and slugging 
(.610). He was awarded the Frank Baumholtz Award for 
the highest team batting a\erage. Krauss was joined in 
his All-MAC hontjrs by junior Matt Stiffler and senior 
Willie Walker who were both named lo the second team 
as outfielders. 

Stiffler put his name in the record books for single 
season records in two categories during 2007. He drew 
the second most walks with 45 during regular season 
play; one walk shy of the record. Earning 8 triples tied 
Stiffler for second place in one season. Those three- 
baggers contributed to a career of ten, which put the 
outfielder at third in Ohio history. At the seasons close, 
Stiffler led Ohio and the MAC in walks and runs scored, 
with 45 and 58, respectively. A .447 on-base percentage 
was strong enough for Stiffler to lead the Bobcats and 
hold second in the conference during 2007. At the post- 
season banquet, Stifler earned the Bob Wren Offensive 
Efficiency Award and the Most Valuable Defensive 
Player Award. 

Walker finished his Ohio career strong, as the only 
Bobcat with a five-hit game during the season. Over 188 
at-bats, the outfielder stiaick out just 19 times, finishing 
the year with a 13-game hitting streak. He held a .362 
batting average at the season's close, ranking second on 
the team and third in the MAC. 

Along with Walker the Bobcats graduated 8 players; 
24 are set to return in 2008. w 




•itri£Syei 




Cfuriesyof 



80 



.. 




BASEBALL 




&„,*»•■/, 



1)2 



sori'iiAiJ, 



Underclassmen make strong first impression; allude to a promising 2008. 

Stor>- by: Brittany Elsdon 
Design b\ : Amy Giannell 

The #7 ranked Ohio Softball team had yet another successful year gaining numerous top spots in the 
Mid-American Conference. Head Coach Jill Matyuch finished her second year at Ohio with promising 
results. Leading the Bobcats in batting a\-erages was senior Debbie Szalejko, freshman Shalene 
Petrich, and senior Kelly Rodriguez. Many of the ladies worked their way to become leaders in many 
of the MAC statistics. Szalejko placed second in the number of hits per game (1.22) and triples per 
game(0.9). Thiee Bobcats (McClucheon, Catlette, Sacks) led the MAC conference in fielding double 
plays. With a season record of 27-31 and a conference record of 10-12, we can e.xpect to see many great 
things ftom this young team in the years to come. <* 




•-y^TlirPisI 



SOFTBAU 



83 




HEN'S TRACK 



ConrUsyof ■ 



iuu\c. our s ■ iui\f;i 



en's Track and Field leaves their mark during final season as an Ohio varsity sport. 



Stor>' bv: Sarah Halniakoi 
Desisn b>: Ann Giannell 



A strong senior class led the Ohio Men's Track and Field through their final season as a \arsity sport. Craig Leon 
IS the^nly male team member to earn AlI-MAC honors. His second place finish in the 10,000 meter at the 2007 Mid- 
nerican Conference Track and Field Championships, with a time of 30:52.10, earned him a spot on the second team. 
m Bailey and Brian King both earned a place on the Academic All-MAC team. Bailey had the fastest 400m time and 

800m time for the Bobcats this season, at 48.62 
and 1:53.74, respectively. King qualified for the 
NCAA Mideast Regionals in Columbia, Missouri by 
finishing fourth at the MAC Championships with 
a time of 9:03.01 in the 3,000m steeplechase. At 
regionals, he finished eighteenth in the same event 
with a time of 9:13.63. King wasn't the only male 
Bobcat to compete at the regional meet. He was 
accompanied by Eric Bildstein and Scott Mayle. 
Bildstein finished 29th in the hammer throw at 
1 74-07. Mayle finished fifth with a jump of 7.48m. 
His distance qualified him for an at-large bid to 
the 2007 NCAA Championships in Sacramento, 
California. Mayle did not receive the bid. 

This senior class had fortune two-fold. Not 
onlv were they able to finish out their careers as 
Bobcats, where as underclassmen were forced to 
transfer or forgo the rest of their careers, but their 
final season was nothing shy of a success. f| 





&rai^Hersh^ 



tric^efTUePosi 



HEN'S TRACK 



85 



pmniiSF OF po ■ Fivi III. ^ 

Underclassman hint at strong possibilities for 2008. 

Stoiy by: Sarah Hatmaker 
Design by: Am> Giannell 

Good news: The Ohio Women's Outdoor Track and Field team earned top honors 
all the way around in 2007. Bettci- news: The majority of those achievements 
were earned by ladies who will be returning in 2008. Translation: Things are only 
going to get better lor Ohio Women's Track and Field. Sophomore Jessica Tanner 
and junior Carime Reinhart were both named to the Academic All-Mid-American 
Conlerence team at the season's end. Tanner finished ninth in the hammer throw 
and tenth in the discus at the 2007 MAC Championships. Reinhart earned her 
second academic nod following a \ery successful junior campaign. She earned a 
first-place finish at the MAC Championships with a time of 36:57.34 for the 10,000 
meter race. 

Reinhart's first-place time earned her a spot on 
the 2007 All-MAC First Team. She was joined by 
heshman Kari Summers, who placed first at the 
conference championships in the 5,000 meter with 
a time of 17:19.12. Summers time was also good 
enough to send her to the NCAA Mideast Regionals in 
Columbia, Missouri. There she finished twelfth with 
a time of 16:42.68. Accompanying her to the regional 
meet, were senior Chelsea Stephan and freshman 
Bahiyjaui Allen, both of who earned spots on the 
All-MAC Second Team. Stephan finished fifteenth 
in the javelin at 136-05. Allen finished seventh in 
the shot put at 49-05.75, a distance long enough to 
make her eligible for an at-large bid to the NCAA 
Championships. Allen, however, did not receive the 
bid and will have to wait until 2008 foi' another shot 
at national competition, i^ 




«'OMi;\'S TRACK 




H OMEN'S TR4CK 




Hit 



4 




THF F/IK 1 IVF 

Ohio Golf sits comfortably 
in the MAC. 

Stoi-y by: Bi ittany Elsden 
Design by: Amy Giannell 

Five seemed to be the luck\ number 
or Ohio's Golf program in the 2006- 
2007 season. Botli the men and women's 
team came in 5th in the Mid-American 
Conference Championship. 

For the female Bobcats, Senii >r Kristen 
\lautz led Ohio in a tenth place finish 
1 1\ erall in the Championship tournament 
thai took place in Nashport, Ohio. Senior 
Meredith Waterston finished 14th overall 
and iunioi" Katie Stafford ended the 
tournament in 21 si place out of the 40 
goiters. 

For our men's team, the Bobcats held 
their own in the MAC Championship 
hosted at The Medallion Club. The 
tournament consisted of some personal 
bests and worsts for the Fab Five. Senior 
Ryan Siekmann led Ohio with 
an 1 1th place finish o\erall. 
Senior Mark Cimarolli 
contributed 1 1 birdies which 
helped him clinch the number 
fifteen spot in the tournament. 
Grant Christman, also a 
senior Bobcat, finished his 
career \\ith a 73 average that 
put him in the 23rd place 
finish in the MAC. ^ 



'Uss cfOhui hci 



60UF 



89 



Club sports offer endless opportunities 
for play to amateur athletes. 

Ston,' by: Sarah Hatmaker 

Design by: Ann Giannell 

As a division of Campus Recreation, 35 club sports are offered to Ofiio 
University students including 9 co-ed club sports. Eacfi group is open to 
students, facult\ and staff and is responsible for its own organization, 
leadership and schedule. The Ohio teams compete against club teams 
fi-om other colleges and universities. Because the teams are part of an 
intercollegiate, competitive league, they require official uniforms and 
equipment. The funds for such amenities are raised by the individual 
teams. Some teams choose to simply divide the costs by the number 
of participants and follow a pay-to-play 
model. Ofliers, like the hockey team, raise 
money through admission costs to home 
games and team fundraisers. Despite 
their status as non-\'arsity atfJetes, all 
members of club teams are held to same 
code of conduct as those who compete on 
the varsity level. Hov\ e\ er, because their 
participation does not affect scholarship, 
they are not required to maintain a specific 
grade point average 

Some exclusively male club programs 
include: baseball, boxing, crew, cycling, 
lacrosse, paintball, soccer, tennis and 
ultimate frisbee. Basketball, field hockey, 
gymnastics, lacrosse, rugby, synchronized 
skating, synchronized swimming, volleyball 
and water polo are all featured as strictly 
female programs. Co-ed sports include: 
equestrian, fencing, mountain biking, 
sailing, skiing and snowboarding, shotokan, 
tae kwon doe, tennis and water skiing, fifj, 





iriisy ofOljcj ^buiU 




MEN'S (;LUII SIHHM'S 




MEN'S ClUB SPORTS 






-« 




/ 



t ' 



f 



1 1 





^^r Alpha Kappa Alpha 



1965 

MissMJX Si it?:jii:nt: 

The purpose of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, 
Inc. is to cultivate and encourage high 
scholastic and ethical standards, to promote 
unitv and friendship among college women, 
to alle\ iate problems concerning girls and 
women, to maintain a progressive interest in 
college life and to be of service to all mankind. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. 

Skee-Week- a week long series of programs 
and community sen ice. The quarterly Pink 
& Green Tea, which focus on issues within 
the commimity with proactive actions being 
put forth. The annual Sophist AKAted 
Gents Ball, where we honor black men on 
campus who are outstanding leaders that give 
back to the community. We also clean our 
adopted street- Stewart Street- multiple times 
throughout the year as well as volunteei" at 
Kimes Retirement Center and United Campus 
Ministries'- Thursday Night Supper. 

i»R5LSll)R M: 

c Chen'elle Turner 

y^DVISOtt: 

Eddith Dashiell 




CM„im- rf 4/r^a A.«-,-.' 'iM.i 




CoMficsy of A/^Ji>i Ki^f" 1 



STIJI»I!IV'I' Olt(iA!VI2!ATIO\S 




STVDEYT 0K(i.t\l7.ITI0!VS 



95 





t 



UPC 

(University Programming Council) 

Students programming with yOU in mind. We 
program events for all students on campus to 
participate in. E\ents include concerts, comedians, 
speakers, and cultural art activities. 

Midnight Movies, Sibs Fest, Mom's Walk For A Cure 
Allison Hit.chner 
Chad Earnhardt 





^ttriesy ij 



!l(i 



S'l'lini!lV'l'tlltti/lMZ/l'l'IO!VS 





1 



Alpha Lambda Delta 

KSTAS5L^Si3r.W 3N: 

1941 

ALD's pui-pose is to encourage superior 
academic achievement among students in their 
first year in institutions ol higher education to 
promote intelMgent hving and assist students in 
recognizing and developing meaningful goals 
for their unique roles in society. 

Charity Ball ^ 



Chris Murname 

AmiSOH: 

Herman "Butch" Hill 




* ' 



W^l)^ 



^ w^^--^- -^i^vj 



SrilDEVr HIUiANIZATIONS 



97 




Courtesy of 4//^a Om- 



- Alpha Omicron Pi 

1988 

MISSION STATIiMliN! : 

The women of Alpha Omicron Pi are tioily unique individuals who come 
together to form a very strong bond. We focus on individual growth as 
well as developing our strong sisterhood. This idea is clearly demonstrated 
through our motto, "Indixidual but United." Our emphasis on scholarship, 
leadership, philanthropy, and sisterhood allows all of our members to 
become mature, \\ ell-rounded women. The great memories and friendships 
we gain last far beyond the four years at Ohio University, they last a lifetime. 

AlVNIJAFKVKN'rS; 

Philanthropy: National Arthritis Foundation 

.^i»Sl3'.Sl!)fiM: 

Kaitlin O'Hara 

y^DVISOtt: 

Lauren Hardgrove 



STIIDKIVT OIUiAIVI/jlTiniVS 




STl'DENT ORG.4<VIZ.4TIONS 



99 



Kappa Phi Club 

The Kappa Phi Club is a Christ-centered organization for uni\ersity women. 
It proxides an opportunity for and challenges them to:De\elop a deeper 
understanding of God, others and self; Realize their individual potential; 
Be a supportive community; Be personally involved, active participants and 
leaders in life of the Church; Commit themselves to positive action. 

Wesle\ Student Center 

ANMJA! EVliM S: ^ 

Rose Tea, Yule Log, Meal in the Upper Room, Rose Bowl, Kappa Phi 
Sundav Valentine's Tea, Degree of the Pine, Degree of the Light, Relay 
« for Life, Midnight Breakfast, Fall Down, Fall Festi\al, Mexican Wedding 

Kristen Welcome 

ADVitSOtt: 

Vicki Butchel 




STUDENT ORUAIVIZATIONS 



101 




STIiniiNT OIUiAlVIZATIOlVS 




OU Council of Teachers of Mathematics 

2003 '^^k 

The purpcise of OUCTM is to enlighten the community on the 
exciting world of mathematics through engaging in activities that 
promote and enhance knowledge and interest in mathematics. 

AFliilAZr^S: 

National Coimcil of Teachers of Mathematics 

OUCTM/ NCTM Conference, Mock Inteniews, socials, professional 
development activities, advisory to the College of Education 



Jim Vanosdall 
Dr. Robert Klein 




'iaycfc'c'rM 



STUDENT ORCANIZATIOKS 



103 



The College of Arts and Sciences Student Ambassadors 

2000 

We are an organization made up 
of students who are dedicated to 
enhancing the college experience 
for all students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

Dars 101 Workshop, First Day, Grad 
School Workshop, A & S Host Program 
C.L.A.S.S., Volunteer Activities 

i>RB'.S5l)S i\T: 

Amy Yau 

Amismi: 




STUniiKT OIO.'AMZATIOIVS 




STIIDEYT ORCANIUTIONS 




O Zone 

2000 

MISSION SI lUiMEiM: 

The purpose of this 
organization shall be to provide 
a social outlet for students as 
they support Ohio Athletics, the 
student-athletes, and promote 
the spirit of Ohio Universilw 

ANNI3A!. SiYF.NTS: 

O Zone members are encouraged to 
show their school spirit at all \ arsity 
athletic events, including Voile vball, 
Field Hockey, Cross Country, Soccer, 
Women's Basketball, Wrestling. 
Swimming &. Di\ ing. Golf, Track, 
Lacrosse, Baseball, and Softball. 

PRIiSIDSXT: 

,;. . Dan Hauser 

ylWVISOIl: 

Jeffery Fitzwater 




inii 





STUDENT ORftAIVIZATIONS 



107 




the Residents Action Council 
(tRAC) ^ 

1994 ^ 

MISSION ST n?:5Ilii% V: 

The Residenls Action Council at Ohio University 
recognizes tlie desire for advancement of the 
residential community; therefore, tRAC strives to 
motivate and involve students through advocacy and 
programming by providing support and an open 
J forum within the communitv of residence halls. 

AFllLL^iiiS: 

National Association of College and \^ 
University Residence Halls, hic. 

ANMJA!. liVIiN'rS; 

Halloween Trick-o-Treat, Sibs Carnival, 
Outdoor Pursuits Leadership Challenge 



PRS^SIWSM: 

Kevin Yurasek 

AiniSOll: 

Mike Hess 




STiinniv'i' oiuiitMZA'iioivs 



Black Student Communication Caucus 

Utilizing communication as a 
po\^criul tool, the mission ol 
Black Student Communication 
Caucus is to encourage 
personal/professional 
development and increase 
participation in the Ohio 
University campus and in the 
Athens community. 

AXMJA! KVKNTS: # 

Professional Development Trip, Etiquette Dinner, 

fessor's Tea, The Black Pases, The Flow, and Jazz Fest 




a-Mtes) frf BSU 



^ro 



i»K3^S5!)li\T: 

Shaylyn Cochran 

7i!)YiS0!l: - 

Carolyn Lew is 





NAMl'.: 
Fsi Chi 
National Honor Society 

1929 ^^ 



*i 



^^^ 



To produce a well-educated, ethical and socially 
responsible member committed to contributing 
to the science and profession of psychology and 
to society in general. To ad\ ance science and the 
profession of psychology; To promote an educational 
experience consistent with the mission; To promote 
ethical and socially responsible members and 
leaders; To deline and establish an organizational 
stiTicture that promotes oiu' mission; To recognize 
and foster the contributions that diversity makes to 
the science and practice of ps\cholog\'. 

AXMJA! SiVKMS: 

Quarterly bake sale to benefit Athens Behavioral Health 
Care. Mock Graduate Record Examination, other 
lundraising opportunities to benefit community mental 

health ort;anizations 




PRJ'.SIDSM: 

: Shenie Tilton 

ADViSOil: 

Dr. Julie A. Suhr 
Stephen M. Patterson 



STIIDEVT OR«;.t\IZ.tTIONS 



109 





Alpha Chi Sigma 

^2000 

To Strive lor the advancement of chemistry by creating 
lifelong fiMendships and networking opportunities 

AFIILIATES; 

Organization: American Chemical Society 

ANNUA!. KVKNTS: ^^ > 

Relay for Life, Boy Scout Merit Badge, Girl Scout 
Merit Badge, Elementary School Demonstrations, 
Community Outreach 



' • Allison Arter 

AmiSOtt: 




110 



S'l'UnKM IHUiAIVIZATiniVS 




^ 


ra 


^^^^Sn^FTl ^ *ff"^ 


■9 

• 


E. -^J 


^ 




PL 


riifei 


'1 


-'« 


:. • 


m^mT iH 


^ 


r/^* 


.^^P^2^ i^m^^^-' ^~- 


1 


w 


1 




1 


S 






B^ 


..:— l^mI 




STUDENT ORKAIVIZATIOIVS 



III 



NAMii: 

GAMMA 
ESi ABIJSIH'J) BX: 

2006 



4 



GAMMA will promote inter-fraternity collaboration regarding major heath issues 
affecting students; assist the Greek system in pro-active and progressive programming 
regarding alcohol use sexual assault, promote alcohol abuse prevention and other 
health and safety related educational programming to all chapters and aid the Greek 
system to implement risk management programs and harm reduction strategies. 

WPA, IFC, NPHC 



ANMJA!. EVliNTS: 



After hours- every Saturday evening in Baker 
Center offei ing free food imitl 2 a.m. 



; , Kristin Delo 

AWVUSOtt: 

Terry Koons 




1 



1 ',^^-s 














112 



S'liiniiM' ()llliA\l/ATU)NS 




fc 

FOWEfi. 

(Promoting Ohio University Wellness, Education and Responsibility) 

1996 

POWER is committed to the development and promotion of healthy Hfestyles in ourselves and 
in our tellow students. Through educating ourselves on current health and wellness issues, we 
are able to share inlormation and resources with our peers and empower them to make positive 
lilesiyle choices. This w ill be accomplished through the planning of programs, activities and events 
that are both educational and fun in nature. Acknowledging that Ohio University students come 
from diverse backgrounds, we are committed to being respectful of differences and will strive to 
% meet the \ aiying needs ( >! our student population. As a POWER member, we also recognize the 
" iMportance of taking care ol oursehes and being positive role models to our peers. 

AXNiJA! li:vli^^'^S: 

Awareness Months for Sexual Assault, Alcohol Awareness, HIV/ AIDS and the Great American 
Smoke Out. Offers peer-to-peer health education programs and after hours late-night programming 

PiWvS^S i\T: I 

Kaleena Schmidt 
Char Kopchick 




Student Personnel Association 

vassi<fcxsriTi:Mi:i%T: 

To scholastically enhance the knowledge of members about current de\elopments in 
the field of College Student Personnel. To promote professional development within 
the organizations membership. To acquaint students who may be considering a future 
in college student personnel \\ ith the profession. To pro\ide a social support for 
^ members, of the orsanization. To encourage members adherence to ethical behavior. 

AFlILlATi:^: \ A 

College of Education, College Student Personnel 
graduate program and 1 ligher Education program 

Graduate Assistance Selection/ Interview Weekend, 
Organize Spring Fling for 2nd year cohort 

EriaGenide ■ 

Pete Mather 
Judy Piercy 

STl'DENT OR<i.4!VIZ.4TIO]V<J 




jmo univei 
dells 



Student Senate 

Promotes student interests, supports 
organizations, and represents the 
undergraduates ot Ohio University. 

Ohio University Studef 
-A Defending Students, OU Student 
^ Senate Book Exchange, Center for 

Student Legal Sei"vices 

ANNUA! liVKiVrS: 

Senate lilections, Piz/a with the 
Provost, Hosting seminars, guest 
speakers, sponsor campus activities 

w,Vi- Morgan Allen 

Am ISOtt: 

Dr. Kent Smith 



^ 





114 



siiii)i<Mom;/ii\i7j\Tio\s 




STiinniNrr oii<.-A\i/uni)i\s 




Oy Tap Cats 

2003 

To provide Ohio University students 
and members of the Athens commu- 
nity with ilie opportunit\ to learn, 
enjoy and eontinue tap dance training 
with performances and workshops on 
campus and in the communitv. 

.4\MJA! KVIi:^^TS: 

Variety sho\\ s with muhiple 
organizations on campus, the 
Movement Organization concerts, the 
School of Dance spring concert, master 
class with guest tap teachers 

PIH'.SSDJiiXT: 

,; , Am\ Singerman 
Jeannette Klein 





M 




i\mi: 

rder of Omege 

1983 







Sigma Alpha Lambda 

2005 , ^ 

Promotes, recognizes and rewards 
academic achievement and unites 
its members in pinsiiit of common, 
good through community service, 
personal development and lifelongj 
^ professional fulfillment. 

^ Participated in West Elementary's 
IP Super Games, hosted ice cream 
socials for the Lindley Inn and 
hosted an ice skating party for Big 
Brothers/ Big Sisters. 

Cory D'Am.brosio 

ADViSOtt: 

Amanda Childress 



PRB^SIWB XI: 

;• Kristen Strobel 

ADVISOtt: 

" Laura Ulmer 



To recognize those fraternity men and women who have attained a high standard 
of leadership in interfraternity activities. ;To encourage them to continue along 
this line; To inspire others to strive for similar conspicuous attainment; To bring 
together outstanding fraternity men and women to create an organization which 
will help to mold the sentiment of the institution on questions of local and 
intercollegiate fraternKy affairs; To bring together the faculty, alumni and student 
members of the institutions, fraternities and sororities on a basis of mutual interest, 
nderstanding and helpfulness; To create an atmosphere where ideas and issues can 
ibe discussed openl\ 



1 



AFllUAiEw«i: 

Big Brothers/ Big Sistei 



acrossG^el^j 



nes and to help work out solutions. 

ylXXlJA!. liVliXTS: 



if Athens County 



Omega MoiUh, Greek 
Awards, Relay for Life 



STUIIHIVT <)ll(i/lM//(rU)KS 



-^ Graduate Student Senate 

GSS was created a half a century ago to sei-ve and represent graduate 
studciils and llieir interests at Ohio University. Graduate Student Senate 
^en es and repi vsents graduate students at Ohio University. Our membership 
"bohcy permits rcpiesentation of graduate students from evei'y department, 
'ScIkxiI, and college. There are many benefits of representing your fellow 
students on GSS. ^'ou can pla\' an active part in the policymaking of graduate 
' student issues and graduate education as a whole. 

jL In the past, membei s of GSS have been members of Graduate Council, the 
Graduate Priorities implementation Team of Vision Ohio, Budget Planning 

♦ Council, and many other important committees. Members of GSS also 
work closely with the International Student Union, Student Senate, and the 
Ohio Uni\ersit> Graduate Council. 

PRy^SBDS :\T: 

Dominic Barbato 
Michael Mumper 




STUDEIVT ORUAIVIZATIOIVS 




Bobcatalina 
i:STABL5S13rJ» aN: 

2003 

The purpose of Bobcatalina ^.^ 
to let anyone, with experience 
or without, work together to put 
on an annual non-competitive 
synchronized swim show, to meet 
new people, and to have fun. 

AXMJAIKVENTS: 

Annual show Winter Quartei; 
S'mores fundraiser fall quarter ^ 

Joe Wakeley 
Marisa Hansel 




118 




S'i'linUM' (HlliAMXATlOKS 




'/ St'ffi^^/i/r./ 



STUDKIVT OK(a!VIZATIO^'S 




If 



OU Multimedia Society 

The Ohio Universitx Multimedia Society is an 
organi/.ation for studeflts who want to explore 
diffeivnt aspects ol design, multimedia, and the 
Internet. Most members are VisCom interactive 
multimedia majors, but all majors are welcome! 
11 \ou'\e used MySpace, Facebook, or played an 
^online game recenth, \ ou've gotten just a taste of 
^Twhat interactive muhiinedia is all about. OUMS 
^^xplores all these aspects and more. This winter, 
■DUMS had meetings covering web hosting, 
viral video, web design aesthetics, and visited 
Resource Interactive, a design a'md marketing 
agency in Columbus. 

AIVMJA? EVK^^'rS: 




showing and critiquing prinf/ "digital work 
discussing the latest teclinologies from Operating 
Systems to IPod's, helping out with VisCom school 
projects,^ visiting design firms in Columbus. 

. PRJilSlDJLXT: 

Julianne-Petrarca 

ADVISOR: 

Sam Girton 

120 S'lUDEIVT OIUiAIVIZATKIIVS 





Colleges Against Cancer 

CAC is a program designed by and 
administered b\ college students fiom 
, across the count r\ and is supported and 
funded by the Anicrican Cancer Society. 
CAC students and staff work through 
difficult '.'hannels to eliminate cancer. 

AFllLlAliiS: 



American Cancer Society 

Relay t( )i Life, Up 'til Dawn, 
Cancer Avvareness Months 

Sarah Slavik 
,. , McKenzie Koss 

" Sharon Romina 




STUDENT 0R<;.4\I7..4TI0NS 




Aviation 



> 




Aslnley Arend 
Commercial Photography 



^•« 




Nick Adams 


Dale Albanese 


Kathryn Allison 


Health Service 


English Literatures 


English 


Administration 


International Studies 






Julie Anstine 
Marketing 




Psychology 




Kana Aoki 
International Studies 




Sara Bailey 
Speech Hearings 
Language Science 



SlimOll CMSS OF 
2007 



^m 




Matthew Baker 




Jennifer Ball 
Forensic Chemistry 



Megan Baldwin 

Organizational 

Communication 




Caitlin Barbour 
Criminilogy & Sociology 



Jennifer Bale 
Public Relations 




Alycia Bashaw 
Exercise Physiology 




David Beachdell 
International Business & 
Marketing 



Brad Bellissimo 
Sports Management 



ams^'^A 



SENIOR CMSS OF 
2007 



Shaylyn Bennett 
Mathematics 





Alison Bernard 
Micro Biology 



Jill Bhatia 
Video Production 



h'-i>« 




Andrea Bils 

Public Relations 



andace Bletzacker 
Dietetics 



Kyle Bickford 
Journalism 




Ashley Boehm 
Mechanical Engineering 



^ 



Chelsea Bollea 
Health Administration 




Dean Bonham 
Communication Studies 




Rachelle Books 
Dietetics 



SENIOR CMSS OF 
2007 




Dion Boranovsky 
Information & 
Telecommunication Systems 




Jonathon Bresnen 
Political Science Pre-Law 



Jessica Brown 
Telecommunications 



Faydra Bozich B^M 
Finances Business 
Economics 




Erik Brown 

History & The Politics 

Of Law 

f'4 < 




Skylar Brown 

Pre Law Political Science 




Coleson Braham 
Broadcast Journalism 



^<^ 



Jeffrey Brown 
Finance 



Sarah Bruton 
Psychology 



smuni ciASS of 

2007 



•»;->. 



'^ 




\ 



Kristen Burkholder 
Biological Science 




Courtney Burns 

Psychology, 

Criminology-Sociology 



Branden Buxman 

Avaition Flight 



Robert Campbell 
German 



SX^j, 




Eric Carlson 
Mechanical Engineering 



Curtis Carman 
Geography 




:v' 



k \ 



Dennis Butcher 
Chemistry 





Kate Card well 
Chemical Engineering 




StephenieCassidy 
Retail Merchandising 



SFJVIOR CMSS OF 
2007 




CaraCoalmer 
Public Relations 




Courtney Cokes 

Early Childhood Education 




Rachel Cook 
English 




Erin Cochran 

Marketing (Sales & Global 

Leadership Certificate) 



Shaylyn Cochran 
Journalism & Political 
Science 





Kristin Compiseno 
Finances Marketing 



;^: 



Kevin Console 
Marketing 




Jennifer Cooper 

Early Childhood Education 



Jobie Cooper 
Art Education 



•«j^fwt: 



SKXIOR ClASS OF 
2007 



Tessa Cooper 
Computer Science 




Kristen Crawford 
Creative Writing 




-^o 



Carolan Coughlin 
Creative Writing 




Lauren Crecion 
Psychology And 
Criminology 





Alexia Cox 

Voice Performance 




Molly Critchell 
Physical Education 
& Psychology 




Lindsay Cutter ^ 


i-r^-nk 


Megan Daugherty 


Katherine Davis 


Organizational 


k ' 


^ Social Work & German 


Early Childhood Education 


Communications 


i 


ll. 





SKMOR ClASS OF 
2007 



.9&\ 



Whitney Davis 
Communications 



Andrea Dessoffy 
Journalism 




Alina Doran 
Accounting & Pre-Law 



Bethany Dawson 
English 



Michael Dilorenzo 
Journalism & Public 
Relations 




Darren Dowd 
Finance 



Paulina Delgadillo 
Forensic Chemistry 




Nicole Domanski 

Interactive Multimedia 




Austin Doyle 
Chemistry 



8KM0R ClASS OF 
2007 




John Dravenstott 
Business 



Mardee Dunzweiler 
Hearing Speech & 
Language Sciences 



T??^^ 



^ 



:-^i 



>?^fS 



Arianna Edwards 
Political Science, Pre-Law 




Amy Ellifritz 

Integrated Language Arts 



r^Mt. 



■'VvS 







Arielle Edwards 
Psychology 



Anita Ewing 
Marketing 




Ashley Edes 
Integrated Science 
Education 




Daniel Edwartoski 
Mechanical Engineering 




Kedra Fairley 

Visual Communications 



SKNIOR ClASS OF 
2(K)7 



Rebecca Fanska 
Middle Childhood 
Education 




Charlotta Fields 
ChemicaqI Engineering 



Angela Fortner 
International Business & Mis 



Julie Feddern 
Hearing Speech & 
Language 




Melissa Flynn 
Criminology Political 
Science & Pre-Law 




Joseph Fortuna 
Criminology 



Stephen Fela 

Marketing Communications 




Michael Ford 
Political Science 




Catharine Foster 
Public Relations 



smum VAASS of 

2007 



^■*^-^i 



■ 1 •;'-^ 



^ 



/>' 




Phillip Fountain, Jr. 
Marketing 



/- 



Stephanie Francis 
Psychology 



Melissa French 

Marketing 




Jeffrey Gardner 
Chemical Engineering 



Janice Frisch 
Anthropology & History 



KatherineGaribay 
Media Studies 



Eric Franz 
Industrial Systems 
Engineering 




Kaitlyn Gannon 
Retail Merchandising 




Clark Garris 
Specialized Studies 



SENIOR VAASS OF 
2007 



f^ 



Alan Jeffrey Gecht 
Psychology 




Jessica Graham 
Organizational 
Communication 



,f ^ «1 




Kaan Gencer 
International Business, 
Marketing, & Economics 




Lekeisha Grant 
Specialized Studies 




Elspeth Gibb " 
Political Sciences 
Sociology 



.'-.vV. 







Christopher Gohike 


Amber Gordon 


Adam Graham 


Journalisms Political 


Dietetics 


Finance And Pre Law 


Science 








Amanda Gray 
Commercial Photography 



smum CMSS of 

2007 



Lo 



Elizabeth Gray 
Journalism 






^ 



J 



\ 



•Brittany Greene 
Human Resource ' 
Managements Mis 




Jaclyn Haas 
Journalism 



^-^•« 




\ 



Edward Gray, Jr. 
Forensic Chemistry 




MalloryGrycan 

Early Childhood Education 




Elizabeth Had ley 
Marketing 



Anthony Green 

Avaition Management 




AmyGwinn 
Nursing 




Elise Haeuptle 
Public Relations 



SKMOU €MSS OF 
2007 



I 




Amy Hale 
Specialized Studies 




Joel Hanek 
Psychology 




Matthew Harvey 
Audio Production 




Jacob Halm 
Industrial Technology 




Megan Hannan 

Early Childhood Education 






Michael Hammons 

Early Childhood Education 



K'' 



Christina Hartkemeyer' ' 

Marketing & Management 
Information Systems 




Ryan Helbach 
Mechanical Engineering 



»*". 



Karia Hemmeigarn 
Production Design & 
Technology 



SKXIOR CMSS OF 

2007 \ 



~>\' 







\^j 



Bryant Hicks 
Integrated Social Studies 



Desiree Hockenberry 

Hearing Speech & 
Language Sciences 




Dustin Holm 
Avaition Management 




Whitney Hill 
Broadcast News 




Abbey Hodakievic 
Psychology 




Amanda Hoover 
Visual Communications 




Kathleen Hobson 
Criminology 




Geoffrey Hoff 
Business 




Carly Hosbach 

Hearing, Speech & 
Language Science 



SENIOR VAASS OF 
2007 




X: 



Kenneth Huddle 

Integrated Mathematics 



Ciara Iglehart 
Retail Merchandise 




Nicholas Ivey 

Political Science & Spanish 




Josh Hunt 
Criminology 




Alison Inglis 
Interior Architecture 




Katie Jackson 
Marketing 



Angela Husted 
Organizational 
Communications 




Akane Ito 
Marketing 




David James ^SSSjSA^ 
Integrated Social Studies 



••f 



smuni ciASS of 

2007 



m 






Jennifer Janda 
Psychology 




I\ 



Steven Johnson 
Specialized Studies 



Leyna Jones 

Integrated Language Arts 



n«« 



John Jenkins 
Sociology & Criminology 




Peter Johnston 
Management Information 
Systems 



RajeshkumarKadim 
Computer Engineering 



Kelly Johnson 
Retail Merchandising 




Jennifer Jones 
Specialized Studies 
Music Industry 




Zachary Kalinoski 
Psychology 



SENIOR a ASH OF 
2007 




Jeremy Kerns 
Integrated Social 
Studies Education 



Amy Klingensmith 

Early Childhood Education 



John Konyesni 
Specialized Studies 



Kevin Kirch 
Mechanical Engineering 



Ashley Klingler 
Special Education 




Jacob Kirkendall 
Sports Management 




John Knabbjr. 
Physical Education 




Andrea Kors 
Industrial & System 
Engineering 



Kent Koslik 
Biological Sciences 



SEMOll ClASS OF 
2007 







Brittany Kress 
Journalism 




Denise Kysor 

Philosophy & Pre Law 







Nicholas La Torre 
Journalm 




Eric Kress 
Economics 



Cristina Lachowyn 

Journalism 




Matthew Lawson 
Sport Management 




Brian Kupresanin 
Accounting 




Megan Lange 
Industrial Systems 
Engineering 




Ryan Lawson 
Avaition Flight 



SEMOR VAASS OF 
2007 




Richard Lockwood 
Biological Sciences 



Kelly Luzenski 
Biology 




Meredith Lee 


Elizabeth Leitch 


Helen Lewis 


Hearing Speech And 


Journalism 


History 


Language Sciences 








Jillian Lore 
Psychology 



Breanne Madden 
Psychology, Pre 
Physical Therapy 




Michelle Lowery-Rowan 
Specialized Studies 




David Mangen 
Finance & Management 
Information Systems 



smnni ciass of 

2007 




Reyna Mangrum 
Theatre Production 
Design & Technology 



Julia Marino 
Magazine Journalism 



Sara McCalman 
Marketing 



Meghan McCloskey 
^*« Exercise Physiology 





David McCowan 
Physics 



Lindsay McDaniel 

Early Childhood Education 



Joseph Martin 
Management & Strategic 
Leadership 




Krista McCormick 

Middle Childhood Education 




Haley McDonough 

Middle Childhood Education 



^^•t 



SENIOR ClASS OF 



Heather McKeever 
Health Service 
Administration 




Megan Middaugh 

Early Childhood Education 




Adrienne Mills 
Organizational 
Communication 



n 




-™-4^^ 



Jennifer McKelvey " 
Integrated Social 
Studies Education^^v 



m 



Jesse Megenhardt 
Industrial Technology 




Bethany Mihalik 
Integrated Science 
Education 



'^ Amanda Miller 
Painting 



im^.nmm 





Katie Monroe 
History 



■'■7''.>, ■ 



Jennifer Moore 
Journalism 



SENIOR VAASS OF 

2007 ^ 



■ J-, -V>i 



John Moorehead 
Civil Engineering 



Brian Morrissey 
Political Science 




Allison Morgan 
Integrated Mathematics 
Education 



Erin Muck 
Exercise Physiology 



Andrew Murray 
Pre-Med 



Michael Newman 
Online Journalism 




Randy Morris.Jr. 
Electrical Engineering 




Megan Murphy 
Journalism 




Katharine Nielsen 
Retail Merchandising 



SKMOK ClASS OF 
2007 



n 



m 



Kyle Norris 
Civil Engineering 




Matt Ondrejech 
Video Production 



Jessica Novotny 

Social Studies Education 




Devon Ortiz 
Industrial Hygiene 




Julie Nuss 

Retail Merchandising 




Margaret OToole 

Political Science 




Kevin Ozebek 


Abigail Painter 


Elizabeth Palm 


Broadcast Journalism 


Interior Archecture 


Hearing Speech & 
Language Sciences 






SKMOR ClASS OF 
2007 



01J4. 



^j^BISi^ 







4 - 



Marcquis Parham 
Recreation Management 



'^!» 



Jill Pascute 
Spanish Education 




Ashley Pence 
Digital Media 



r^O 



Justin Park 
Political Science 




Monica Payne 
English 



JanisPenn 

Integrated Language Arts 



Matthew Parker 
Wildlife Biology 




Shanita Payne 
Retail Merchandising 




Charles Pennix III 
Pre-Med 



SENIOR CIASS OF 
2007 




Adam Pergram 
Political Science 



Julianne Petrarca 
Interactive Multimedia 




Stephen Ploetz 
Wildlife Biology 




Caitlin Perry 
Journalism 



Lindsay Petroff 

Telecommunications 
Management 




Ginger Poling 

Early Childhood Education 




Chelsea Peters 

Film 




Natalie Pezzenti 
Journalism 




Megan Powers 
Telecommunication 
Media Studies 



SEXIOR VAASS OF 
2007 





Ana Rivera 
Psychology 




Lauren Rapin 

Visual Connmunication 




Michael Rice 


Corie Richards 


Telecommunications 


Journalism 


Management 





Chloe Larae Robbins 
Hearing & Speech 




Emily Reed 
Sociology/Criminology 




Glenn Richter 
Cartography 




Christopher Roberts 
Psychology 



SKNIOK ClASS OF 
2007 



Camille Robinson 
Mechanical Engineering 



Asiiiey Rowland 
Art Education 



Lyndsey Rowland 

Early Childhood Education 




Lindsey Rusk 

Telecommunication 

Management 



Kyle Savoca 
Accounting 




Christopher Sams 

Avaition 



Todd Scarpitti 
Marketing 




Derek Satterfield 
Marketing & Finance 




Rebecca Schleich 
Hearing, Speech, & 
Language Pathology 



••••^ 



smuni CMSS of 

2007 



rJr;f 



Katharine Sechkar 
Hearing, Speech & 
Language Sciences 



f^ /^ 



Cassie Shaeffer 
Health Services 
Administration 



A 



Sayward Schuette 

Specialized Studies 




George Seese 
Integrated Mathematics 




Megan Shafer 
Biological Sciences 





Patrick Scott 
Accounting 




Melinda Sewell 
Computer Animation & 
Interactive Multi Media 




Darcy Shaffner 
Dance 



SKMOR CIASS OF 
2(M)7 




Evan Shaw 
Video Production 



Ashley Sheehan 
English 




Taeksoo Shin 
Sports Management 




Krista Shirey 
Industrial Systems 
Engineering 





Samantha Shupe 
Speech Hearing & 
Language Sciences 





Jamie Siegel 
Psychology & Spanish 




Andrew Sigler 


Jessica SikorskI 


Michael Silverman ] 


Marketing 


Middle Childhood Education 


Marketing & Management 
Information Systems 



SKMOR CMSS OF ^^c 



^^^^^^^H ^^^^^^^^B ^^^^^^Hi 


«1 


Jerrold SinrfSR*** ^^^^^H 
Electrical Engineering jRBj 


m 




Andrew Smith 
Recreation Managennent 






VV,-,, 




Katherine Simpson 
Journalism 




Gabrielle Smith 
Middle Childhood 
Education 





Crystal Simson 
Forsenic Chemistry 




Jeffrey Smith 
Journalism 




Matthew Smith 


Micah Smith 


Nathaniel Smith 


Political Science, Pre-Law 


Business Management & 
Management Information 
Syst 


World Religions 



SKMOR CIASS OF 
2007 




Austin Snyder 
Finance & Mis 




Wesley Somogy 
Phiiosopiiy 




Christina Stark 

Early Childhood Education 



(^ 



Micah Snyder 
Mechanical Engineering 




Jennifer Spence 
Integrated Science 
Education 




Mallory Starr 
Mechanical Engineering 



^^^ 



Heidi Sochia 
Telecommunications 




John Stahly 

Marketing & Management 

Information Systems 




Michelle Stein 
Sociology & Criminology 



SKNIOR ClASS OF 
2007 



y^M 



:m 




Laure ^ 

International Studies 




Vaughn Stewart 
Music Production 




v;^ 



Christopher Stenken 
Latin American Studies 



Leah Stoner 
History 



t 

1 


a 




1 


. . d 




^ 


f 


/ 



Dwayne Steward 
Journalism 




Hayley Stovcik 
Political Science 




Nicholas Sugar 
Urban Planning 




Brandy Sydnor 
Hearing, Speech, And 
Language Sciences 



David Szomoru 
Accounting 



SKMOR CMSS OF 
2007:«r 



YurikaTanizaki 
Industrial Technology 



Erin Taylor 
Specialized Studies 



AbbyTerlecki 
Magazine Journalism 




LindseyTevis 

Organizational 

Connmunication 




Nicole Thompson 
Political Science/ 
Public Administration 




Tyler Thompson 
Electrical Engineering 




Shannon Tilton 


Sherrie Tilton 


S.R. Tilton 


nternational Studies 


Psychology 


Organizational 
Communication 



SKNIOll €MSS OF 
2007 



J*3>^ -ST^f 



David Trinnes 
Marketing & Business 
Pre-Law 



Thomas Valente 
Sports Management 






I 



BriannaVoight 
Journalism 




Weiton Troutman 
Mis 



Alison Vargo 

Political Science 






LindseyWade 
International Business 
& Finance 



MarkTusay 
History 




EricVescelius 

European History 




Nicholas Wainscott 
Sports Management 



SENIOR ClASS OF 
2007 




LisaWareham 
Psychlogy 





Adrienne Washington 
English Creative Writing 



M 



LindseyWalpole 


James Walton 


Richard Walton 


Health Service 


Physics 


Mechanical Engineering 


Administration 








Monica Weiss 
Art History 




Kristen Welcome 
Psychology, Pre 
Physical Therapy 




Lindsey Wesselkamper 
Finances Mis 




Casey Westlake 
Political Science & 
Journalism 



Sli:XIOR CMSS OF ^m 
2007 vs 




Christine Whitt 
Spanish Education & 
Spanish 



10^^ 



Derricl<; Withers 
History 



Kathryn Wichmann 
Business Management 
& Human Resources 




Maureen Woods 

Finance 




Alissa Winkler 

Origanizational 

Communication 




Elizabeth Workman 
International Studies 
& French 




Amy Yau 

Biology & Bio-Chemistry 


Reid Zarnoch 
Marketing 


P42 




mmm 


1 lf= 


L 


2007 




UutyRajas 




Coufiesy 



\m 




i — 





^' This part of my life... this part riqkt liere? 

This part is called 'happiness. ' 
^^ -P ursuit of Happyviess- 




161 



+ 



Ciooc{ fyieyids are hard to fmd, difficult to 
leave, a^td iynpossible to foraet. - Anom/mous 




1S3 




■f 




As time cjoes on, the best years of our lives will be remembered by 
photos we took of ourselves. We'll bavidle our own history, revisina it 
as we CIO alona, deletina the ones that don 't look like our reflections 
anymore. All that will remain will be imaaes of people that look nothina 
like us. -John Mayer- 




^■;! '^ A r: 



^^ 






•▼T 



^Ttni 






r<-^r!*T 



.^- L 


1 
1 


f 




i 


^4 


-4 








4- 




a when you come to the end of all the licjhtyou know, and 
it's time to step into the darkness of the unknown, faith is 

_ kyiowina that one of two thinas shall happen: Either you will be 
aiven something solid to stand on or you will be tauaht to flyP 
-Edward Teller- 





♦ 



ft 



Sometimes when we loose ourselves in fear and despair, in routine 
and constancy, in hopelessness and tragedy, we can thank Qodfor 
Bavarian suaar cookies. And fortunately, when there aren't any 
cookies, we can still find reassurance in a familiar hand on our 
skin, or a kind and loving gesture, a subtle encouragement, a loving 
embrace, or an offer of comfort. Not to mention hospital gurneys 
and nose plucjs, an uneaten danish, soft spoken secrets and fender 
Stratocasters... and maybe the occasional piece of fiction. And we 
must remember that all of these thinas: the nuances, the anomalies, 
the subtleties, which we assume only accessorize our days, are here 
for a much laraer and nobler cause. They are here to save our lives. 
-Stranger Than Fiction - 



IK!) 



« 




(( 



I believe the choice to he e?<ceHeyit hecjins with 
alimiyicj your thouahts and words with the 
iyiteyitioyi to remire more from yourself. 
-Oprah Winfrey- 




'Mm. A 





171 



You will do foolisk tkmgs, but do 
them with eyithusiasm. ^^ 
-Colette- 





173 




^ 



m 



n 



h a cltyfuH of empty faces/ Rubber soles otn 
brick laid pavement/ You my sweet are the one 
I see/ A treasure to be found in these remains '' 
-Jake Housebolder- 




175 




)iin\cf' Roblu 



j^^^ .>^i 









.;*.. 




♦ 



rr 



/ would not exchanae the lauakter of my heart for the 
fortuyies of the multitudes; nor would / be content 
^ with converting my tears, invited hy my aaonized 

self into calm. It is my fervent hope that my whole life 
OH this earth will ever he tears and lauahter. 
^ -Kahlildibran- 



«.' 



177 




There is viothma like returmna to a place 
that remains unchayiaed to fmd the 
ways in which youi yourself have altered. 
-Nelson Mandela- 



1711 




ITS 



THANK YOlJ'S ^ 



Jim Rodgers 



David Shelton 



Robin Fritts and Jostens, Inc. 



Paul Wimmler and Educational Services, Inc. 



Baker University Center 



The Front Room 



COLOPHON 



The 102nd edition of the Athena Yearbook was 
produced by students at Ohio Uni\^ersit}' in Athens, 
Ohio, from September 2006- May 2007. The full-color 
yearbook covers events of fall and wdnter quarters in one 
176-page hardbound edition. Spring quarter events will 
be covered in a 32-page supplement, \vhich is scheduled 
to be produced during the summer months. 

The co\-er was designed by Da\dd Shelton. All pages 
were designed using InDesign CS on Apple iMacs. Other 
software applications used included Adobe Photoshop 
CS and Microsoft Word. All pre-press production was 
done in-house with page negatives delivered to the 
printer: Jostens, Inc., located in Clarks\ille, Tennessee. 
Robin Fritts was the Jostens' representative. 

Senior portraits w^ere contracted out to Jim 
McAdams of MJM Studios based in Greentown, 
Indiana. Educational Services, Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia, 
collected corporate advertising, with Paul Wimmler as 
representative. 

Four-process color was used for all pages. The fonts 
used throughout the book were Stencil, New Aster, 
Caliban and Freest>4e Script 



The cost of this vearbook was $75.00 





Photo by; James Rob 



low! 




Michefina's, Inc. 
P.O. Box 550 
100 East Broadway 
Jackson, OH 45640 
Tel: (740) 286-5505 
Fax: (740) 286-8275 
www.michelinas. com 



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by ordering your slatwall directly from us, the 
manufacturer. 

Order your slatwall online through our slatwall 
configurator. Our quick seven step configurator 
makes ordering slatwall online fast, easy and secure. 



STOKI FIXniU SOU/TTONS 



Shop Now! Visitwww.gabriellogan.com 



1689 E. Front St. • Logan, OH 43138 • 800-780-0004 



P 



183 







nW®DCRAFT 

J Helping You Make Wood Work^ 



Over 7,000 Products In Every Store! 



When woodworking is your 
passion, woodworking tools, supplies and 
expert advice from Woodcraft can help take 
your woodworking to the next level. 



PFEIL® "Swiss Made" 
Carving Tools 

Exclusive United States 
distributor of "Swiss 
Made" tools. For over 
32 years we have 
offered our customers 
carving tools that we 
believe are the finest 
in the world. These 
tools are made with a 
dedication to quality 
unsurpassed in today's 
high-tech world. 



\ 





^ 



Parkersburg Woodcraft Store 

4420 Emerson Ave 

Parkersburg. WV 26101 

304-485-4050 

IVI-T-W: 9am - 7pm • Tli: 9am - 9pm 

Fri: 9am - 7pm • Sat: 9am - 6pm 

Sun: 9am - 5pm 

To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store Of For A Free Catalog, 
Visit www.woodcraftcom Or Call 1-800-542-9115, 



QUALITY WOODWORKING TOOLS • SUPPLIES • ADVICE" 



ilti 




You're smart, you're prepared, and above all, you're responsible. And 
you want to work for a company who's responsible, too. That's where 
Liberty Mutual cx)mes in. For us, responsibility means letting you actively 
apply what you've learned to a position where your contribution really 
counts. It means providing you with the training, on-the-job experience, 
and support so that you can succeed. It means professional growth and 
promotions based on your contribution. And, it means fostering a culture 
of integrity and upholding our distinct mission to help our customers live 
safer, more secure lives. 

You deserve to be recognized - so introduce yourself online at 
www.libertymutual.com/getstarted or visit our booth at an upcoming 
career fair on your campus. 

Inclusion is the answer Lit)erty Mutual is an equal opportunity employer 



Responsibility. What's your policy?' 




Libert\^ 
Mutual. 




construction 
itigation support 
manufacturing 
not-for-profit 
iiealtfi care 
financial institutions 
government 
financial planning 
employee benefits 



^OJ^ & Clark, Schaefer, Hackett & Co. 

r integrity 

^ ' Vou want an accounting and business consulting 

partner you can trust. For nnore than 60 years, 
hundreds of companies across the Midwest have 
put their trust in the objective advice and personal 
service of Clark, Schaefer, Hackett. To see how our 
integrity has paid dividends for a variety of clients, 
visit us at... 

w WW. cshco.com 




U 



Claik,Schaelei;HackEtt«J{i 

CUTlfSD PUIUC ACCOISIAKTI ^"^ 

lOJHEU coiisrjAKn 



Cincinnati Office 
513-241-3111 



Dayton 
937-226-0070 



Middletown 
513-424-5000 



Springfield 
937-399-2000 



Columbus 
614-885-2208 



185 



n 



ursing Students/Graduates 

Be part of a teaching environment where you will continue 
learning throughout your career. 



Full-Time and Part-Time openings are currently available on a variety of patient care units and offer: 

• Highly competitive hourly base pay 

• Flexible schedules 

• Free CEU offerings 

• On-site fitness center 

• Many other benefits & advantages 

Please apply online at: www.miamivalleyhospital.org 



• Tuition Loan Repayment 

• Evening, Night and Weekend shift differentials 

• Internship Program 

• Clinical ladder 



# 



Miami Valley 
Hospital 

Premier Health Partners 




Miami Valley Hospital is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer committed to a culturally diverse workforce. 
We encourage qualified, diverse candidates to apply. 



Nurses: Touching Lives with Care 



Each and every day, 

nurses change lives. 

They are with us in the best of times. 

And in the worst of times. 

Nurses give us hope. 

Understanding. 

And courage. 

There is no profession more 

challenging. 

Or rewarding. 

Than nursing. 




We celebrate the special people who 
are answering the call. 

By pursuing nursing as a career. 

A profession. 

A way of life. 

We honor those who find the 
strength. 

The commitment. 

The compassion. 

To make this a better world. 

To become nurses. 



Congratulations, Nursing Graduates! 
/WADENA 



lIKi 



IT Careers 



Want to join one of America's IVIost Admired Companies? 



Our IT jobs go beyond support. They drive our entire business. 

If you're IT savvy, we've got jobs that will get you recognized. Casual environment, job 
stability and diverse training included. If you hunger to be part of a business that values 
IT ingenuity, then you might be just our type. 

Besides an obsession with the latest technology, and a chance to work with diverse 
and bright colleagues, we offer competitive pay and great benefits: 

• Medical, dental and vision care • 401K 

• Gainshare • Education and child-care assistance 

Our Cleveland location offers: 

• On site medical facilities • Fitness centers and training programs 

Check us out at jobs.progressive.com 



PROGRESSIVE 

Eg.jaiopponun.ty Employer. hVF/Q^ liSBS Tlmk EasiBT. Think ProgTesslveC I 

©2005 Progressive Resource Services Company 
Mayfield Village. OH 




f Kr- ^CS^ I 



^ 




FOR THE BEST SELECTION OF 
BOBCAT CLOTHING ANO OIFTS 




Visit the Follett's University Bookstore. 



www.folletts-ohiou.bkstr.com 



©follett's University 
Bookstore 



63 South Court Street - Ph: 740/593-5547 



Serving ihe Ohio UnixTreity Communii> • Home of the FRFF Popcorn! 



% 



oUett! 



,com 

bookstore network 



0inBBS071907A 



187 



Choose 



SOMC 



You chose a career in health care out of a desire to make a 
difference. You should choose the place where you will 
work for the same reason. 



• National award winning programs 

• First hospital in the state to win the 
prestigious OPE Governor's Award 

• Stateofthe-art facilities 

• Competitive wages 

• Innovative services 

• Cutting edge technology 

• Empowered staff 

• Opportunities for growth 

• A vision for the future 



ve^y. 



Good things are happening here 
Southern Ohio Medical Center 



740|356-5000 | www.somc.org 



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i 



HOCKING VALLEY 



C D M n 



H D S P I T R L 



Hocking Valley Community Hospital is a 103 bed 
acute care facility serving Hocking and surround- 
ing counties. This JCAHO accredited hospital 
provides all phases of medical care including 
family practice, cardiovascular services, internal 
medicine, obstetrics and occupational medicine 
from a staff of over sixty physicians. 

Congratulations to the 
Graduating Seniors! 



601 State Route 664 N. 
Hocking, OH 43138 

740-380-8000 

Fax:740-380-8312 

www.hvch.org 



Congratulations OU Class of 2007! 




apetland. 



Join our Team! 

If you love animals and like people, then we may 

have the right career for you! National and International 

Management Training opportunities available. 

Send resume to: 

Petland 

Attn: Stacy Hopkins 

250 Riverside Street • Chllllcothe, OH 45601 

www.petland.com eoe 




If you plan on going 
home for the 
holidays... you 
should plan on 
working for UPS! 



Earn extra money as a 

Seasonal Driver Helper 

Work near your neighborhood! 

Earn $11.76/hour 

No driving required 

Work Monday-Friday, 9am-6pm 

(Approximate start and end times) 

Must be 18 yrs or older & lift up to 70 lbs. 

Will also accept employee referrals of family and friends! 

Apply online at: 

www.upsjobs.com 

UPS IS an equal opportunity employer. 



imt 



BELMONT SAVINGS BANK 





Ohio University Eastern 
Congrats to the Grads! 




Checking Accouru 
Sav ings Accounts 
Certificates 
of Deposit 



Bell aire 
676-1165 

St.Clairsville 
605-O14O 




Home Loans 
Auto Loans 
Personal Loans 



Powhatan 
795-4565 

Barnesville 
425-1 901 



^ 



STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 



Shelley Metz Baumann Hawk, Inc. 

A Partner in Construction and a 
Long Association with Ohio University 

Bentley Hall Auditorium 
Ridges Auditorium Renovation 
Natatorium 

Bio Science, Bio Technology Laboratory 
Peden Weight Training Facility 
McGuffy Hall Renovation 
Collins Center - Ironton Campus 
Shoemacher Center - Chillicothe Campus 
Porter Hall Rehabilitation & Addition 
Convocation Center Rehabilitation 
Edwards Accelerator Lab Addition 
Human Resources Building 

Congratulations to all Alumni 



1166 Dublin Road, Suite 200 Columbus. Ohio 43215 

T 614 481-9800 F 614 481-9353 www.smbhinc.com 




TW 'Ti 




V 



If you'd like to be a leader among leaders, consider 

joining the best company in the area! Lincoln Electric, a 

cutting-edge company known for its accomplishments in 

the design and manufacture of quality welding products 

and equipment has the following positions available. 



Lincoln Elearjc offers challenging positions in Technical 
Sales or a variety of Engineering assignments in R&D, Manu 
facturing Engineering, Plant Engineering and Automation. 

Degrees required include an MS or BS in: 

Electrical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Material Science Engineering 

Physics 

Chemistry 

We offer a 6-9 month training program and great benefits including 
tuitionreimbursement. If you are a December or May graduate and 
would like to submit a resume, forward it to: 

Dick Conklin, Director, Staffing & Human Resources Planning, 
22801 St. Clair Avenue. Cleveland, OH 44117-1199, 

Fax: 216-383-4765. 

Visit our website for more I ■ [ . ) T^ll I t^ I® 
information. wa^aMM^BBn^i^J ] 

1 ELECTRIC I 



www.lincolnelectrK.com 



> 



Partners in 
Progress 
for Over 
60 Years 

IVoni luiinble 
hcipnnings in the 
( ireat Depression, 
Buckeye Rural 
l-.lectnc 

C'<K)i)erati\e has 
t;i(mii and e\()hc(l 
into a high-ltc li 
ulilit>, using tJie lat- 
est IT and coniniu- 
nication ecjuipnient 
to provide sjile, I^iptojjs in tnicks... 

reliable, 
economic 
senice. 





Buckeye REC 



189 




avuf. and jbcuUd 

Jackson ScPerkins 



The employees of 
Bear Creek Operations 

would like to wish the 

2007 Ohio University Graduates 

Best Wishes 

in all of your future endeavors. 
We have enjoyed the new friend- 
ships and experiences working 
with every student and would 

like to 
extend our congratulations 

and thanks to your 
hard work and dedication. 



B EAR C R E E K 

Holiday Empluyntent Opportunities 
1-800-866-3182 »««.bLO.com 




CHAPMAN PRINTING COMPANY 

a Division of Champion Industries 



PRINTING ' MAIL SERVICE ■ OFFICE FURNITURE 
OFFICE SUPPLIES • PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS 



^ Garrison3rewer 



Call 800.458.8596 and we'll help you make a statement. ...and more. 



CHARLESTON -i HUNTINGTON -> LEXINGTON j PARKERSBURG 




Atlas Trailer Rental, Inc. 

Since l')74. 

Truck &. Trailer Service Center 

504 29th St. 
Parkersburg,WV26101 

Phone: (304) 485-3853 Fax: (304) 428-6072 





CONGRATULATIONS 

Class of 2007 

RESPONSIBILITY MAHERS 



ATHENS, OHIO 



CCassic "Brands JAtfiens 



Meadl/Vestvaco 



i 




LancasterRestaurantSupply.com 



Lancaster Restaurant Supply 

664 South Columbus Street 

Lancaster, Ohio 43130 

740-653-7652 

Ohio Only 1-800-686-7861 

www.lrsatw.com 




Career opportunities include: 

Quality Assurance • Engineering • Marketing 
Contact us at: MeadWest\ aco Calmar 

Human Resources Department 

2550 Kenstciil Avenue 

Washington C.H., Ohio 43160 

Or, visit us at: w\v"v\.cahnar.com 

An Equal Opportunity l-jnployer M/F/V/D 



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MURRAY ENERGY CORPORATION 




QHIOVAllDy r^^ 

IBl!,43IEIUC15CQU.C^" 

Resources 




UtaMmerican Energy, /nc. 




BIERT 



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Maple X ^''^'i 
M/n/ng, Inc. 



iiX^y.yi: ^: 



"Rely on our Companies for dependable, low 
cost coal supplies." 

Mr. Robert E. Murray - Chairman, President, 
and Chief Executive Officer 

bobmurray@coalsource.com 

For coal pricing and availability, please 
contact: 

Mr. B.J. Cornelius. President 

The American Coal Sales Company 

bcornelius@coalsource.com 

101 Prosperous Place. Suite 125 

Lexington. Kentucky 40509 

Phone: (859) 543-9220 Fax: (859) 543-1720 



Remember the exhilaration you felt 
as a kid zooming along on your bike? 



Ci) 



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Discover that feeling again by choosing 
Berger Health Systems as your career path 

Dedicated to diversrty, we offer excellent 
medical and dental coverage, life insurance, 
public employees retirement system 
continuing education, and a healthy, fun place 
to work Shape your future and discover new 
paths of opportunity 

We offer the opportunity to work in the 
dynamic teaming environment of a 
community health system Circleville enjoys 
a great location with easy access to sporting 
events, scenic countryside, nature trails, and 
the excitement of the city 



For information on current opportunities 
please call 740-420-8338 



BEflGER HEALTH SYSTEM 

TmE health choice 

wwwbergerhealth.eom 

hr(5)berqerhealth.com ^— 





Stanley "Electric 
Congratulates tfie 
2007 graduates! 

420 E. High St. 

London, OH 43140 

Phone: 740-852-5200 

Fax: 740-845-2984 



i»i 




ProviderServices 



MAKING A DIFFERENCE ONE RESIDENT AT ATIME... 

Provider Services offers challenging and rewarding work environments in which our employees can grow 
professionally and personally. We are proud of our commitment to employ the most compassionate and 
dedicated associates to care for our residents. 

We have many career opportunities in our facilities throughout Ohio, some of which include; 

. RN's, LPN'sandSTNA's 

• Occupational, Physical and Speech Therapy 

• LNHA (Licensed Nursing Home Administrator) 

We offer excellent benefits, competitive salary, flexible schedules and many other benefits. 

To become a part of our outstanding team of healthcare professionals please contact Joyce at 
js(5)provlder-services.net or call 440-614-0160 ext 212 or fax 440-614-0168. 



"The foundation of every 



state IS the education 



of its youth." 



Diogenes 



102 





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